An Open Mind May Lead To Healing

Parkinson’s Disease is a designer disease without any glamour or style. Unique to each owner is a brew all of its’ own. Put a room full people with this illness all together and you’ll see an array of symptoms of varying combinations but you probably won’t encounter any two exactly alike.

Parkinson’s Disease, for all the research, press, and money that has gone into this disease, frankly, has not come that far. There are medicines to stabilize patients for only so long, risky and invasive brain surgeries that may temporarily delay or reduce some symptoms, and some therapies that assist sufferers in retaining their voice and mobility, but the breakthrough that was promised 20 plus years ago when I was diagnosed has yet to come.

If each one of has such a unique case, maybe that means each of us has a unique combination of triggers that set the course for this development. If that is the case and we set the parameters either genetically and/or emotionally, it just may be within our reach to find our own cure.

As radical as it may sound, I whole-heartedly believe that our bodies, given the right information and regimens, an openness to self-discovery, and a willingness to change just may lead our bodies to healing themselves. Combined with Western medicine and Eastern therapies,  a proper balance of physical and mental conditioning can, does, and will reverse or at least improve the damage of illness.

My long journey with Parkinson’s has led me down some dead-ends but I have seen successes. In my hunt for healing and therapeutic answers to improving my condition, I have seen Reiki (see posting 28) make the largest impact on this disease. Amazingly, the scientific community shies away from testing this therapy so it is conveniently discounted and dismissed.

As a Reiki practitioner and Reiki Master (in a 1 year training program), it is my belief and hope that anyone reading this posting strongly consider that an open-mind and a willingness to help yourself can lead you to the answers and assistance that you seek.

This is my journey and I wish you well on yours!

About Karl Robb

Karl Robb has had Parkinson’s disease (PD) for over twenty-five years. Karl believes he has had PD since he was seventeen years old and was diagnosed at the age of twenty-three. Now fifty, he is a Parkinson advocate, entrepreneur, inventor, writer, blogger, photographer, Reiki Master, and speaker on PD issues. Karl is the author of the book, A Soft Voice in a Noisy World: A Guide to Dealing and Healing with Parkinson’s Disease. He has been chosen as a blogger partner for the 4th World Parkinson Congress being held this September in Portland, Oregon. He has a bachelor’s degree in English from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His writing has been featured in The New York Post and he has appeared on BBC radio, the CBS Saturday Evening News, Japanese television, as well as several local Washington, D.C., television stations. Karl is a former board member and a Virginia assistant state director of the Parkinson’s Action Network and a board member of the Parkinson Voice Project. You may reach Karl via email at asoftvoice@gmail.com, visit his blog at www.asoftvoice.com, on Facebook, or contact him via Twitter @asoftvoicepd.

Posted on February 9, 2011, in Education & Support, Health, Parkinson's Disease, Philosophy, Reiki, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. Parkinson’s is a unique disease indeed. Each day brings a new set of challenges with new obstacles in our way to face. That being said, we (those of us living with Parkinson’s) must overcome each days hurdles, not necessarily with complete success but with a general effort. It takes work applied consistently and persistently to face the adversity that we face.

    This is also true for our care providers because they experience an equal amount of pain and sympathy for what we go through. Yes, PD may not be as well known or as understood as we’d like it to be. Just once, I’d like to not have to explain why my voice is so shaky along with the rest of my body. I suppose in the big picture, I have placed in me an important role to play, that as advocate. For when I speak up about PD, I find that for me, that is therapy that lasts a lifetime.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: