Timing in Parkinson’s Disease May Be Everything

Do you find yourself losing track of time? Do you ever miss a dose of your medicine because you get  distracted from the task at hand? Well, you are not alone. This is a common problem with Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients as we somehow find keeping track of time to be a challenge.  Multi-tasking for someone with this illness is probably a mistake but if an orderly and defined task list with a defined time of completion is stated, there is a much better chance for that task to be fulfilled, as long as the individual is capable of performing.

So much of being capable is scheduling your medicines appropriately to your day. Keeping up on your daily regimen can be a full-time job in itself.  The longer that you have this illness the more important it is to remain diligent in monitoring how your body is reacting to your medicines. Too little medicine in your system and signs of PD show through and too much medicine unleashes unwanted side-effects. On top of the maximizing of your medicines add the variables of how you slept the night before, how much stress you are under, what you ate and how much, and even your mood and state of mind. Even the weather can play a part in how you are functioning today. As I write this, I have no empirical research to back this statement up, but I know for me, weather has an impact on my condition and how the meds work or not.

Here are 5 tips or suggestions to getting more out of your medicines and your day:

1) Something as simple as wearing a watch that beeps on the hour can keep you aware of the day and alert you to when you may be due for your next dose. There are some elaborate and helpful timers and pill box systems to keep you on track for sale. If you are interested , Google “electronic  pill box” or “pill timers” for more information.

2) I find a little caffeine with my medication speeds the uptake. This may not work for everyone and if you have heart problems or a problem with caffeine, don’t try it.

3) Calm your mind and body for at least 5 minutes a day with a meditation. As you get more used to meditation you can do it for longer periods. Try different types and see what works for you.

4) Keep as fit and active as you can be. Build a regimen that you can stick to. Try to incorporate stretching, balance, walking, and maybe weight training. Consult with your doctor and a qualified physical therapist or trainer who understands PD.

5) Challenge your mind daily. A daily crossword or Sudoku can be a wonderful way to get your brain going for the day–but keep track of your time!

This is my 50th posting. I would love to hear from you, the reader.  If you enjoy this blog, please pass it on to others who may find value in it. Please subscribe to this blog and you will be automatically notified when this site is updated.

Thank you for taking time out of your day to read this. http://www.asoftvoice.com

About Karl Robb

Karl Robb has had Parkinson’s disease (PD) for over thirty years. With symptoms since he was seventeen years old, Karl was diagnosed at the age of twenty-three. Now fifty-one, he is a Parkinson’s disease advocate, an entrepreneur, an inventor, an author of two books (A Soft Voice in a Noisy World: A Guide to Dealing and Healing with Parkinson’s Disease and Dealing and Healing with Parkinson’s Disease and Other Health Conditions: A Workbook for Body, Mind, and Spirit) with his wife and care partner, Angela Robb. He has blogged for ten years on his website, ASoftVoice.com. He is a Community Team Member to ParkinsonsDisease.net and is a contributor to PatientsLikeMe.com. His blog, ASoftVoice.com, has been recognized four years in a row by Healthline.com as one of The Best Parkinson’s Blogs of 2018, 2017, 2016, and 2015! Healthline.com also listed the book A Soft Voice in a Noisy World in their list of Best Parkinson’s Disease Books of 2017! FeedSpot.com has recognized ASoftVoice.com for 2018 and 2017 as a Top 50 Parkinson’s Disease blog. Karl was a blogger for the 2016 World Parkinson Congress in Portland, Oregon. He is a frequent speaker on Parkinson’s disease issues as well as an experienced advocate for Parkinson’s issues throughout the United States. He is also an advisor and consultant on Parkinson’s disease. Karl is a board member of both the Parkinson Voice Project and Parkinson Social Network based in Virginia. He was an active board member (6 years) and an advocate (18 years) with the Parkinson’s Action Network (PAN). In his free time, he is a photographer, constant writer, longtime magician, and a practicing Reiki Jin Kei Do master. Karl received a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has been featured by The New York Post, BBC Radio, CBS News, National Public Broadcasting (NPR), in The New Republic magazine and NHK World Television, as well as several Washington, D.C., television stations. You may reach Karl via email at asoftvoice@gmail.com, on Facebook, or contact him via Twitter @asoftvoicepd. I’m available for speaking engagements to share my experience living with Parkinson’s disease. Please contact me at asoftvoice@gmail.com if you are interested in having me speak to your group, conference/symposium, or would like me to write an article for your newsletter or blog. I am not a medical professional and this information is my personal view. I am just sharing my medical journey with you, the reader. I encourage you to seek all avenues that can benefit your condition.

Posted on June 13, 2011, in Education & Support, Health, Media & Trends, Medications, Parkinson's Disease, Philosophy and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Great advice for people living with Parkinson’s. I’ll validate the weather affects me too.

  2. Thank you for this post. I was recently diagnosed, and find myself losing track of time a lot (especially on days off). I have not missed a dose, but have been late on a couple of occasions, but my dosage is fairly low at this point. This was very helpful to me personally.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: