Give & Take

I paid the price for trying to save some time on the return from my vacation to Seattle. In the hope of maximizing my schedule, I elected to take a red-eye, only to return with a nasty flu bug that has cost me a week of productivity, discomfort,  and general health. Even worse, my best friend and bride, Angela, suffered a more severe version of stomach flu, thus disturbing her digestion and resulting in a close call with severe dehydration. The dehydration led us to an urgent care facility. It was not a night to relish.

I avoid emergency rooms, clinics, hospitals, or any place that houses needles or scalpels. Needless to say, when my spouse began experiencing stomach cramps, backache, nausea, vomiting, severe thirst, loss of appetite, and diarrhea, I knew it was time to punt and call on the medical community. Angela no longer could hold fluid down without severe cramping and/or nausea or vomiting. After 2 days of no sustenance and minimal liquids, this was getting more and more worrisome. We both worried about the other’s malaise and colorless face. We tried to take care of one another in our stupors but neither of us barely had the energy to do anything but sleep and even that was a challenge, at times.

It was Friday night at 7PM when we arrived at the emergency care facility. There was a calm before the storm in the waiting room, for screaming children, bleeding noses, and paramedics would be by to join us shortly. There was no wait at the counter, as we explained why we were there.  We would explain at least 3 more times later to the doctor, nurses, and staff. Following the paperwork, waiting in the lounge, and watching a news story on an at large serial killer, I was anxious to see my wife experience some relief from her constant stomach and body aches.

After what seemed to be an eternity, we were called in and Angela received a gurney and sheet thinner than a tissue. She was unable to get comfortable and the staff did little to try. The gown was neither flattering nor thermally functional. Following several warnings to anyone who would listen, we explained that Angela’s veins even when hydrated were a challenge to locate, but with 2 days of severe dehydration, connecting with any fresh hemoglobin would take a detective with remarkable talent. After 3 nurses, 1 lab tech, and a doctor, Angela had bruises, needle holes, but no IV fluid bags that she needed so badly. Two hours of tension, frustration, and being in a hostile environment was enough for us.

We elected to scrap the IV, give Angela a dissolving anti-nausea pill so that she might take her own fluids at home, and get her resting comfortably back in her own bed. The pill broke the cycle and she soon was able to retain fluids and mended quickly. She still has the bruises from the needles that did her little good.  The bruises are slowly fading–the memory is still quite vivid.

About Karl Robb

Karl Robb has had Parkinson’s disease (PD) for over twenty-five years. Karl believes he has had PD since he was seventeen years old and was diagnosed at the age of twenty-three. Now fifty, he is a Parkinson advocate, entrepreneur, inventor, writer, blogger, photographer, Reiki Master, and speaker on PD issues. Karl is the author of the book, A Soft Voice in a Noisy World: A Guide to Dealing and Healing with Parkinson’s Disease. He has been chosen as a blogger partner for the 4th World Parkinson Congress being held this September in Portland, Oregon. He has a bachelor’s degree in English from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His writing has been featured in The New York Post and he has appeared on BBC radio, the CBS Saturday Evening News, Japanese television, as well as several local Washington, D.C., television stations. Karl is a former board member and a Virginia assistant state director of the Parkinson’s Action Network and a board member of the Parkinson Voice Project. You may reach Karl via email at asoftvoice@gmail.com, visit his blog at www.asoftvoice.com, on Facebook, or contact him via Twitter @asoftvoicepd.

Posted on December 16, 2011, in Health, Media & Trends, Philosophy and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. I hate to hear what you & Angela went through. I can’t understand the behavior of the emergency room staff! I hope Angela is on the mend now. Jean

  2. Thanks for your caring comment, Jean! After 6 days of stomach weirdness, I’m on the mend. It was quite a visit and Karl did a fabulous job retelling the story. Much better than I would have 🙂

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