Why Did The Medication Stop Working So Fast–The Antibiotic Dilemma

When my medications turned off immediately for no apparent reason, I was befuddled and beyond worried. Not long ago a good friend experienced the same perplexing event with no medical forewarning. I saw an increase in balance issues, a reduction in drug benefit, and it took a longer time for to receive any benefit from my Parkinson’s disease medications.

Be aware of what might be interfering with your medications..

Be aware of what might be interfering with your medications.

It is a topic that I have seen no discussion on and yet to hear any doctor or patient bring to light. That most elusive of topics is the inclusion of antibiotics and the whirlwind of turmoil that can come with it.

Antibiotics disrupt the balance of our stomachs and the important enzymes for healthy digestion. They wipe out both the good and bad stuff in your gut, thus causing problems with the stability of your medications. As we all know, without absorption through the blood-brain barrier Levodopa and other medications lose their potency and overall efficacy.

So, the next time your physician wants to talk about putting you on an antibiotic for a toothache, infection, or anything that crops up, discuss with your doctor what the potential  side-effects might do to your Parkinson’s disease drugs and know what you may be facing. The antibiotics may be needed, just be prepared and consider a good probiotic to replace those digestive juices.

I am not a doctor and this is not medical advice. This is personal opinion and my events. Discuss this with your doctor before you make any changes. Share your stories with me and my readers, if you like. I will share your stories.

About Karl Robb

Karl Robb has had Parkinson’s disease (PD) for over thirty years. With symptoms since he was seventeen years old, Karl was diagnosed at the age of twenty-three. Now fifty-one, he is a Parkinson’s disease advocate, an entrepreneur, an inventor, an author of two books (A Soft Voice in a Noisy World: A Guide to Dealing and Healing with Parkinson’s Disease and Dealing and Healing with Parkinson’s Disease and Other Health Conditions: A Workbook for Body, Mind, and Spirit) with his wife and care partner, Angela Robb. He has blogged for ten years on his website, ASoftVoice.com. He is a Community Team Member to ParkinsonsDisease.net and is a contributor to PatientsLikeMe.com. His blog, ASoftVoice.com, has been recognized four years in a row by Healthline.com as one of The Best Parkinson’s Blogs of 2018, 2017, 2016, and 2015! Healthline.com also listed the book A Soft Voice in a Noisy World in their list of Best Parkinson’s Disease Books of 2017! FeedSpot.com has recognized ASoftVoice.com for 2018 and 2017 as a Top 50 Parkinson’s Disease blog. Karl was a blogger for the 2016 World Parkinson Congress in Portland, Oregon. He is a frequent speaker on Parkinson’s disease issues as well as an experienced advocate for Parkinson’s issues throughout the United States. He is also an advisor and consultant on Parkinson’s disease. Karl is a board member of both the Parkinson Voice Project and Parkinson Social Network based in Virginia. He was an active board member (6 years) and an advocate (18 years) with the Parkinson’s Action Network (PAN). In his free time, he is a photographer, constant writer, longtime magician, and a practicing Reiki Jin Kei Do master. Karl received a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has been featured by The New York Post, BBC Radio, CBS News, National Public Broadcasting (NPR), in The New Republic magazine and NHK World Television, as well as several Washington, D.C., television stations. You may reach Karl via email at asoftvoice@gmail.com, on Facebook, or contact him via Twitter @asoftvoicepd. I’m available for speaking engagements to share my experience living with Parkinson’s disease. Please contact me at asoftvoice@gmail.com if you are interested in having me speak to your group, conference/symposium, or would like me to write an article for your newsletter or blog. I am not a medical professional and this information is my personal view. I am just sharing my medical journey with you, the reader. I encourage you to seek all avenues that can benefit your condition.

Posted on August 25, 2015, in Education, Education & Support, Health, Medications, Parkinson's Disease, Wellness and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. This has also happened to me only once in ten years. Indeed, it was after a nasty GI virus that landed me in the hospital for what seemed to be cardiac issues, but was instead dehydration and low magnesium levels. I’m sure my gut flora was changed, tho without antibiotics. Following that, I was like another PD person. Normally, someone looking at me would notice an uneven gait, but many tell me they wouldn’t know I had PD. After the virus, I could barely walk, had that shuffle walk with the forward propulsion, was losing balance on my heels, and looked like I was 90 yrs old with PD. My MDS said the worst thing I could do was to increase meds. This was temporary and might take 2 weeks to go back to ‘normal.’ That the best thing I could do is rest and the worst was to push myself. He was right. Although I did push myself to get back to limited exercise.

  2. We had a similar experience with an antibiotic and PD meds, I won’t name it here but my wife was prescribed for gastrointestinal problems and she had a severe reaction (rashes, swelling, itching). We took the extra steps to not only let all our doctors know but our pharmacy as wwell. We call that, reverse education. It sounded better than backwards medical training. Kind of like live and learn, experience makes for good teaching or lessons by patient practice. How about, patient driven medicine? Thanks Karl for a great blog!

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