Monthly Archives: September 2017

“Let It Go” – Reprise

Explore your creativity!

Clinging on to that which does not serve us only weighs us down. Rather than control our emotions, if not monitored closely, they may control us. I have seen anger and resentment consume the strongest of men and seen it bring them to their knees. I have seen a quick temper ruin friendships as well as careers. I have seen jealousy and greed destroy the trust of what appeared to be the most solid of marriages. Retaining negative emotions can do nothing positive. Why do we hold what we don’t need?

If you can make yourself sick, can you make yourself well? How often did your parents tell you that you were going to make yourself sick because of worry? Whether it was guilt, worry, anger, hate, anticipation, anxiety, or some other emotion, maybe we have the same ability to make ourselves well, if not better! We probably didn’t get ill overnight, so it is unlikely to think that we will get well overnight.

Letting go takes practice, discipline, and intuition. It takes timing. Knowing what to keep and what to release sometimes takes a leap of faith into the unknown. It requires bravery and will.

Not everyone is prepared to or immediately willing to release years of pent up anger, bitterness, hurt, or bad memories. Some of us are better than others at avoiding confrontation, forgetting our pasts, and discarding the regrets and losses of of our lives. Depending upon the severity of our emotional challenges, professional counsel may be required to realize what is necessary to move forward. I have little doubt that our emotions have a direct connection to entire body’s well-being.

Remember to let go of what you don’t need or just what doesn’t benefit you. That’s what I’m hoping to do.

–Reprise January 2012 – re-edited 2017

 

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An Inspirational Magic Man

I believe that people come in and out of our lives for a reason. Often, they may have an important message to relay or an example to emulate. Whatever the case, if we pay close enough attention to those people that we encounter on a daily basis, we might just recognize what it is that we need to learn from the encounter.

As an avid amateur magician, I enjoy finding and visiting small local magic stores in cities that I may be visiting. I have been to close to a dozen small magic shops over the years, and I continually meet the most fascinating, entertaining, insightful individuals who also share my appreciation for the great art of performing magic. I met the owner of the last magic shop in North Carolina. This store is in Asheville, NC and is called Magic Central.

One of these amazing individuals that I was lucky enough to meet was a gentleman by the name of Ricky D Boone. Mr. Boone has been a professional magician for almost 40 years. Even more remarkable is the fact that Mr. Boone was born with a rare bone disease. His mother was told that he wouldn’t live to be 4. Ricky is 67 years old.

My selfie with magician Ricky D Boone at Magic Central, Ashville NC

My selfie with magician Ricky D Boone at Magic Central, Asheville NC

He is reliant on a wheelchair but to be in his company and to watch him work, all disability goes out the door. To see him perform magic looks so fluid and effortless. His humor and patter put him in control of the room, and the feeling is comforting. This is the sign of a true showman.

Ricky did card tricks for my wife and me. His sleight of hand ability was most impressive. I didn’t notice anything out of the ordinary. His patter was smooth and entertaining.

Ricky has received numerous awards and accolades for his performances and wonderful praise for his inspiring lectures. He is the recipient of two Emmy awards for a documentary on his life.

Ricky Boone is so much more than a magician. He is a model for us all in overcoming obstacles in our lives. He is a living miracle. Mr. Boone is a true inspiration to me, only after having the gift of getting to know him for about an hour. I am so grateful to have had the opportunity to meet a man with such spirit, grace, humor, compassion, and presence. Boone‘s charity, The Vanishing Wheelchair is an extension of his drive to help others break down barriers for the physically challenged, through the art of magic.

I am reading the book about Mr. Boone, The Four Foot Giant And The Vanishing Wheelchair by T.J. Shimeld. I am truly enjoying the book and plan to report more on this amazing man!

Ricky Boone is more than an entertainer – he’s an inspiration for us all!!

Enjoy #SingOut2017 Concert via Live Stream tomorrow 9/9 2pm CDT 

Watch the world’s largest Parkinson choir give a concert tomorrow, Saturday 9/9 at 2pm CDT. You can watch the performance either in person at Richardson High School

1250 W. Belt Line Road, Richardson, Texas 75080

-Complimentary Valet Parking

-Reception to Follow Performance

or watch the LIVE stream of the concert at the Parkinson Voice Project Facebook page.  For more information you can also visit: http://www.parkinsonvoiceproject.org/ShowContent.aspx?i=1834

It’s so inspirational and moving to witness over 100 unified parkinson voices as one loud harmony! You need to hear it and share the triumph of these singers as they raise their voice in song. I encourage you to listen and experience this magical presentation.

Just so you know, I am a supporter and board member of the Parkinson Voice Project and have been for over ten years.

Dyskinesia Isn’t A Dance and It Really Isn’t Funny!

Dyskinesia is the uncontrollable jerky movement of hands, feet, or head. Often misunderstood, dyskinesia is a side effect of the Parkinson’s disease medication. Sometimes, this side effect is embarrassing, annoying, and at times even dangerous. Besides drawing attention to you from complete body writhing, dyskinesia can be exhausting. When I experienced 1 to 2 hour episodes of dyskinesia, I would feel like I ran a marathon without ever leaving home. Small spaces, sharp edges, and anything glass or breakable was a potential hazard. Trying to hold a drink with dyskinesia is a struggle, as your hand wants to splatter everything in sight but your mind screams, “Don’t do it!”

Tremor and dyskinesia are different. Unlike tremor, dyskinesia is bigger than a rapid twitch or tremble. At times, my entire body wiggled and flailed. It still happens, but only on an infrequent basis. Dyskinesia interferes with delicate and precise movements as well as simple everyday tasks, like making a sandwich, pouring a drink, or slicing bread. Someone with dyskinesia may struggle to brush their teeth, comb their hair, or just perform normal acts of daily living. Constant care and awareness is heightened to avoid food from flying everywhere.

BellPeople who don’t know me that well, who may see a brief shake, may laughingly call it a “dance”. Calling dyskinesia a dance may be meant to lighten the severity and discomfort of the event for all involved. Dancing is by choice—dyskinesia is not. I tolerate this comment but admittedly wish that those calling dyskinesia a dance could refrain from reducing a drug interaction that affects so many, to a recreational act. Dyskinesia in public is a teachable moment! Explaining to the uninitiated that this isn’t part of the illness of Parkinson’s has been a constant challenge.

Understanding dyskinesia from the non-scientific perspective isn’t that complicated, but trying to negotiate it, reduce it, and calm it, is the hard part. Never knowing when or where it might crop up can keep you on edge. It adds more stress—not what you need! Over time, I have gotten better about finding some control with the help of meditation, yoga, breathing, and reiki.

I realize that the distinction between tremor and dyskinesia probably in the scheme of things isn’t all that crucial, but what is important is the way either symptom is accepted by the public. Educating the public and demystifying the nuances of Parkinson’s can bridge the gap and clarify just what the public should understand about symptoms and side effects related to Parkinson’s disease.

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