Monthly Archives: December 2017

The Magic in Magic!

The Magic isn’t gone, but it is fading fast. The art of magic will never die, but it may become blurred, as new technology replaces the beauty and purity of performance magic. Live magic is just that—it’s magical. When performed correctly and the magician has done his job, the participant feels that the impossible is, possible. Some magicians embarrass or make their audience feel stupidly duped. The magician is meant to impress but not to break the bond between audience and performer. Magic is for everyone: young or old, there is a place to appreciate the grace and fluidity of sleight-of-hand. One should appreciate the trickery of the eyes and misdirection. Cleverness is worth recognition!

The sad reality is that the neighborhood magic store has rapidly gone away for good, only to be replaced by the video game. This dying art has a long history, reaching back to ancient Egypt and possibly even longer. To lose the joy that this art has sprung on so many, and for so long truly is a tragedy, indeed.

I hope that as generations and technology continue to evolve, that the creative minds of those drawn to magic can continue to update and improve upon the wonders of magic. Magic can be reinvented and re-introduced to new audiences in novel ways as materials and new innovations appear.

Keep the Magic Alive!

I have written about the benefit of video games and Parkinson’s disease, but had a deficit of articles on the benefits of performing and practicing magic. I think that aside of the many years of enjoyment of entertaining myself and an occasional audience, magic has given me numerous gifts that I will quantify:

-Magic makes you think in order and organized linear steps.

-Magic forces the performer to communicate, socialize, and be more outgoing.

-Magic helps improve eye-hand coordination and joint flexibility.

-Magic is universal. Magic is entertaining. Magic is sheer fun.

-Magic doesn’t feel like therapy, but maybe it is!

Walt Disney is quoted to have said, “It is fun to do the impossible!” Magic is about making the impossible, possible, even if it’s just for a moment.

 

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Snow Bell

Enjoy!

First Day of Winter–Oh Snow–Ho Ho!

Winter is cold and Winter is icy,

The days are dark and the roads are dicey,

Snow can be pretty when it is new,

As it gets older it looks like burnt stew,

As I get older, the cold gets less tempting,

From occasions galore, I find myself exempting,

Okay, I admit my blood is quite thin,

Blame it on age, it isn’t a sin,

Ice and sleet, I really don’t like,

It probably goes back to being a tyke,

Starting today, I’ll stay inside,

I’ll sit by the fire with cocoa and hide.

 

 

 

My Holiday Card!

My card to you for these holidays,

Is one of appreciation, in so many ways,

My focus is Parkinson’s but I’ll try to write more,

My goal is to share insight and options to explore,

As the holidays near and you may take on more stress,

Be kind to yourself, and worry less on the mess,

Enjoy your family and your treasured friends,

Keep the spirit, long after the season ends,

Thank you for reading and joining my site,

To all of you readers, I wish you a goodnight!

Thank You!

Giving Shouldn’t Be Painful

This morning I received one of those nuisance solicitations from a charity that I had never heard of and still can’t even remember. The caller was clever enough to use a phony id tag of someone we had previously called earlier in the morning. What a devious ploy!

The first thing she said was nearly the most insulting! “Is this Angela?” To which, I replied “Does this sound like, Angela?” I am a 51-year-old male, who sounds nothing remotely close to that of my lovely wife. Either she wasn’t listening, or didn’t care. Not a good start to getting my confidence!

The lady (loosely used) on the call was what I believe to be a sophisticated robocall. The charity organization claimed to be a breast cancer charity (breast cancer was instrumental in my mother’s death) which is a cause near and dear to me.

The female voice on the other end adamantly requested for me to agree to pledge some random amount. Going from high to lower but never addressing my reservations, I was growing more and more angry with the handling of this call.

I asked the voice, “Just how much the charity took and how much went to breast cancer research?”: Her response was disappointing:

“That’s a good question! Fifteen percent goes to research and eighty-five percent goes to administrative costs. Can I put you down for twenty-five dollars?” I couldn’t believe that she thought that I could have been so gullible to say anything near of affirmative! Thus, ended the call!

This is the time of year that charities bombard us with end of year requests. Be empowered, be informed, and don’t be shy to ask what that charity is doing with your hard-earned money. Unless you have a long-established relationship and are familiar with the charity or charities of choice, don’t be afraid to ask the hard questions. You have every right to ask where your money goes and how it is to be used. You also have a right to answers that satisfy your curiosity.

Here are some suggested questions for the charity fundraiser:

  • Are you a registered 501c3 not-for profit?

  • Are you on www.charitynavigator.org?

  • How much of my donation goes toward the cause and not administrative costs?

  • Do you work for the charity or are you a paid solicitor? If so, you might tell them, “I will save the charity money and make my donation directly—but thanks for reminding me”.

  • Do not feel pressured that this call is your one and only opportunity to contribute to the cause. If a charity is pressing you for a donation, take another look at the charity and do some background work.

It is easy to be lured into a convincing charity charade that sounds honest and true to purpose. If you want to know what kind of research was funded by the charity, then ask them. They should be proud of their work, not secretive! If you need time for research and to get answers, there is no reason why you can’t ask them to call you back later.

You are in the driver’s seat to your charitable giving. Don’t feel pushed and pressured by paid solicitors! You should feel confident and enthusiastic about the charities to which you give. The best way to be confident about your charitable giving is to know who, what, where, and how your donation will be used. Don’t be afraid to make a difference, just do your homework to make sure you are educated and satisfied with where your donation is going.

Remember the Day!

The view was expansive. The calm of the site was not what I expected. I was torn whether to break the sanctity of the place and document my visit with a photograph. There is peace at this place of horrific loss of life. This place, Pearl Harbor, is a time capsule and monument to tragedy, heroism, and bravery.

The serenity of the harbor and the still glass-topped water are so deceptive as they hide the brutality that took place here.

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