Search Results for reiki

Taking the mystery out of a reiki treatment.

 

Calm and Very Cool!

Calm and Very Cool!

The time has come to demystify the word reiki (ray-key). “Rei” means light and “ki” or “chi” means energy. Many of you who follow my blog, know how important this complementary therapy/energy treatment is to me and just how it has changed my life for the better.

Just this weekend, friends who have known me for over 15 years, were amazed to see me bring a halt to my dyskinesia just by using the practice of reiki. One dear friend, who was in agonizing back pain, came to my wife and I for a treatment in hope of some relief, to which she got. Reiki doesn’t do everything you need and it isn’t a cure—it is one more tool in your toolbox. We are all unique and the code that works for me may not register for you, but isn’t it worth investigating? Everyone can use one more tool!

Reiki is a practice with ancient roots.  The reiki method/protocol I use was developed in Japan over a hundred years ago. The reiki that I practice comes out of a lineage call Jin Kei Do which combines a practice of Qi gong, meditation, and the use of touch to transfer universal energy.

Reiki can be effective for: balancing one’s personal energy, reducing fatigue, lowering anxiety, helping to get a better night of sleep, reducing pain, and a assisting a variety of other challenges. The practice is performed by nurses and some doctors in over 100 hospitals in the United States. Slowly, this treatment is gaining the credit that it deserves.

How is a reiki session performed? A reiki treatment or session is very simple. The client, unlike a massage, remains fully clothed and either sits in a chair or lies on a massage table on their back while the practitioner lightly touches or even works inches off of the body. The client does remove their belt, shoes, and eyeglasses and gets on the table or chair and is asked to relax and to just breathe. The practitioner very gently and lightly touches the head, chest, stomach region, legs, back, and feet.  The client may feel heat, cold, tingling, or nothing at all. Often, like my first time with reiki, I fell asleep on the table, for over an hour and woke up feeling much better and more refreshed than when the session began–that is what started it for me almost 20 years ago. That is why I decided to learn reiki for myself. I was skeptical, until I actually experienced it. Once the session is over, the client is gently awoken, given a drink of water, and sent home. Benefits may last weeks until the next treatment. Sessions can last as long as 1.5 hours or as short as 15 minutes and usually are about the price of a massage.

The beauty of a level 1 reiki class is that it is all about self care, so you can learn to perform reiki on yourself, whenever you choose. If you decide you want a better understanding of this energy treatment there is level 2,3, and mastership, which in my lineage is a 1 year training program.  I suggest going to your practitioner/teacher to receive the benefits of their treatments and to experience it before, you commit to learning it yourself. The reason I decided to become a reiki master is that I saw the benefit of reiki help my Parkinson’s so I wanted to teach reiki to others with Parkinson’s.  In order to be able to teach reiki, one must become a reiki master (in our lineage).

Combined, my wife and I have worked on at least 100 people with Parkinson’s disease and their carepartners. We have seen benefit from these treatments, even when they sometimes can’t see the results themselves. The first thing we notice is a clarity in their eyes, sometimes an improvement in clarity of mind, better mobility and flexibility, or just a release of tension and anxiety. I also have seen smiles and a softening of the face muscles.

In 2013, at the World Parkinson Congress (WPC) in Montreal 2013, I had the privilege to work on 9 people with PD, and 8 of 9 expressed a benefit from the treatment. I even saw an improvement  in the person who didn’t see a difference. They were more relaxed and appeared more refreshed after the treatment. Some people don’t verbalize their experiences with reiki as fully or clearly due to this new sensation.

My wife, Angela, a reiki master, as well as many other experienced reiki masters, massage therapists, yoga teachers, and I plan to work at WPC 2016 in Portland, Oregon at the Wellness Way area of the conference. Wellness Way is an area where you can experience therapies or just take a quiet respite and enjoy a  moment or more for yourself.

I encourage you to explore reiki and other such therapies to see if they might assist you along your journey as you look for relief from stress, anxiety, or fatigue. I encourage you to find a referral for a reiki practitioner near you to offer you a free sample or trial period to see if you like it. Please make sure that they are experienced, sensitive and aware about your condition.

Join me today 2/16 Sunday Connections with guest Reiki Master Megumi Abiko

I hope you can join me today for this exciting event!

Join Karl and Angela Robb this Sunday at 5pm EST/2pm PST  as they host Sunday Connections http://www.sundays.parkinsonsrecovery.com/ with guest Megumi Abiko, Reiki Master Teacher of Reiki Jin Kei Do.

Here is Megumi’s bio:  Having gone through a spinal injury and being told my prognosis was being paraplegic was a HUGE wakeup call!  I was fortunate to have a friend who introduced me to essential oils that stopped the swelling in my spine so that I regained full mobility! With that experience, it fired my interest to learn more about Holistic health. Each day I realize how powerful Essential Oils and Reiki is in my life!  Through my practice, I’ve seen firsthand how the combination of the modalities can benefit all aspects of your life: Mental (behavior modification, stress management, emotional release, depression), Physical (backaches, allergies, and other diseases) and spiritual. I feel lucky to have been taught great gifts to add to my tool box that will help me, help others, become empowered one person at a time.

You can submit questions online ahead of the event by using this link: http://InstantTeleseminar.com/?eventid=51628782 .  Click the “Ask a Question” link and complete the information in the box that appears below the button.

Here’s the Link for listening online for Sunday Connections. Listeners online can listen to the live event and can submit questions.

http://InstantTeleseminar.com/?eventid=51628782

Or if you would like to call in, in which you can ask the hosts and guest questions live and listen to the event.

Primary dial in number: (425) 440-5100
Secondary dial in number: (323) 476-3997
Guest pin code: 200414#

Reiki and Parkinson’s Disease

Over a decade ago, I had the good fortune of meeting my current Reiki teacher. When he introduced me to Reiki, I thought it to be pure quackery, but I had nothing to lose in keeping an open-mind. After experiencing Reiki, I was not only hooked but I was changed for the better. That was twelve years ago , and today I am in a one year mastership training course with my same teacher with the hope of sharing my ability with others dealing with Parkinson’s disease.  I have witnessed a transformation not only in myself but also with those whom I have worked on and seen as the healing energy calms, relaxes, and improves the conditions of those willing to try it.

Seeing may be believing but true experience seals the deal. When I walked into my first Reiki session, I was walking poorly and my balance was off but an hour after my first session, I felt rejuvenated and my walking  was dramatically better. Do I have empirical scientific evidence that Reiki made this miraculous  alteration in my condition and can I prove that it was the Reiki that has helped me to actually improve over the past 10 years and not see my symptoms decline? The only evidence that I have is the end results and those results are impressive in my humble opinion.  Show me a drug or procedure that is free and non-invasive that has that kind of success.  I have little doubt if it were not for my learning how to do Reiki for myself, I would be in a far more serious condition than I am in today.

My wife and I recently announced a local class to teach level 1 Reiki to people with Parkinson’s as well as their care-partner. The response was overwhelming. In less than a week our class overfilled with the need for  placing people on a waiting list. Undoubtedly, this will not be our last class.

I believe physicians and neurologists especially, should be recommending Reiki to their patients as additional therapy. There is no reason not to prescribe something that increases energy, quiets the minds, calms the heart, relaxes the muscles, and reduces dyskinesias. Yoga, meditation, acupuncture, and chi gong should also be investigated as a cocktail of therapies may be of benefit. As for me, Reiki has proven itself to me and science has yet to identify the untapped benefits that it reaps. If you can find anything better for someone facing Parkinson’s disease, I don’t know what it could be.

This is my opinion. I am not a medical doctor and this is not medical advice. This is what works for me.

An Introduction To Reiki

There is little doubt that human touch is of benefit to our well-being. When I speak of touch I mean it in  the most caring and compassionate of ways and not just in a sensory manner. Touch is therapeutic and I have great confidence  that it is the  highway to relief and possible healing.

If you’ve never heard of Reiki, then I hope that this posting will intrigue you enough to learn more about what it is and what it does. In the end, I hope I can encourage you to experience the power of Reiki. I think it best to get an understanding of what Reiki is from my dear friend and Reiki Master, Gilbert Gallego, who over 11 years ago showed me how Reiki could improve all aspects of my life. I have seen Reiki greatly reduce my symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease, lower my stress, give me peace and calming, and provided me with a greater understanding of who I am and what I am capable of achieving. First, learn what Reiki is and where it came from and then I will tell you some amazing but true stories of what I have seen Reiki do:

This text  comes from http://www.reikijinkeido.org and Gilbert Gallego, a Reiki Master in Fairfax, VA.

Reiki is a Japanese word. The Kanji Rei means spirit, and Ki means energy or life force. In essence, Reiki can be interpreted as spiritual or universal life force energy. Reiki is also known as the Usui System of Natural Healing, a very simple technique to aid in the process of healing and many believe that it leads to a path of self-transformation. Reiki was initially brought to the United States by Mrs. Hawayo Takata, a Japanese American who studied it in Japan in the 1930’s. Reiki has since become the fast-moving energy modality in the West during the past 30 years.

Reiki was developed in the early 1900’s by a Japanese Shingon Buddhist named Mikao Usui.  Master Usui was a well-known scholar and respected healer in Kyoto who undertook an extensive study of healing phenomena as taught through history’s greatest spiritual leaders. Through his travels, research, and meditation, he was led to an ancient healing method based on a combination of Buddhist practices performed only by monks and kept as secret knowledge. It is believed that Dr. Usui learned part of this method and received special empowerments and a meditation through which he expanded his understanding of the energy of healing. He spent the rest of his life practicing and teaching this knowledge. One of his students, a medical practitioner named Dr. Chujiro Hayashi, gave this method a proper structure, which lay people, could practice. Today, this method is now known as “Reiki”.  From www.reikijinkeido.org

Eleven years ago, I knew nothing about Reiki. By total coincidence, if you believe in them, I met Gilbert, my teacher. I had heard of a therapy called Trager (which is very different than Reiki) and found that he was the nearest practitioner in my area. I went for Trager but found Reiki. My wife, Angela, who suffers from migraines came along with me to the appointment. Gilbert explained Reiki to us and we both had doubts and were wondering why we were even in his office? We were true skeptics. I was reluctant to get on the massage table (fully clothed by the way) and Angela agreed to watch but that would be the full extent of her participation–that didn’t happen!

A little over an hour later, after coming in stiff in the legs and a bit tired, I felt refreshed and rejuvenated. I felt wonderful and it showed! My face beamed and seeing this, Angela, with no hesitancy,  decided to go next. She too experienced the power  of Reiki.

This was the first step on our eleven year Reiki journey.  Eleven years later, my wife and I now begin our one year training as Reiki Masters. I have seen Reiki do some wonderful and unexplainable results for me, my wife, my animals, and friends.

Here is just a brief list of what I have experienced with Reiki:

  • I have seen Reiki stop or dramatically reduce dyskinesia (uncontrolled movement).
  • I have seen Reiki diminish or even subside headaches and pain.
  • I saw Reiki lower my mother’s blood pressure before her first chemo treatment.
  • I have seen Reiki reduce stress and help improve sleep.
  • I saw Reiki drastically reduce a Cancer patient’s pain from an 8 to a 3 on a 10 point scale (10 being the highest). That patient was my mother.

These are just a few of my experiences with Reiki. If you would like to learn more, please contact me for more information.

Alike but Different!

I have hobbies: I write, I read, I travel, I photograph, I do Reiki, and I collect shark’s teeth. Shark’s teeth are elegant, silky, shiny and smooth. They come in all shapes, sizes, colors, textures, and tones. Just like people with Parkinson’s disease, all the teeth are totally unique and full of character. The teeth are technically a waste product of discarded chompers that are fossilized over long periods of time. Some are black, brown, gray, speckled, multi-toned, sharp, dull, serrated, or pointed.

I can’t explain the connection that I have to these tiny but beautiful pieces of art. Nature and time have created a cornucopia of remarkable masterpieces. Some pieces are almost gem-like, worthy of display and adornment. Often, their beauty is overlooked, underappreciated, and cast aside because beachcombers fail to recognize what is right in front of them. They fail to identify the magnificence and uniqueness of the diversity of each and every piece. The teeth are results of wear and tear from years of natural forces, while being tumbled through swirling water and abrasive sand. The varieties of sharks combined with the range of conditions affecting the teeth, create a product that is easily underappreciated and often overlooked.

Diversity, it is to be respected and upheld, for without diversity, the world would be boring and tasteless. The splash of colors and striations throughout some of the teeth are due to minerals and variations from the water’s varying pH level. These imperfections in the teeth, add beauty and character, plus they make each tooth memorable and one of a kind.

It takes a fresh perspective to look at something so common, with new eyes. We must look deep and see what is there and not be influenced by what others may want us to see. Some will try to influence what we see. Most of us know what is right and what is wrong. Appreciating these teeth took realization and a level of understanding. I see their beauty even if some do not.

Building blocks for a future for better health!

Trust, faith, hope, and diligence are four key components to seeing your way through any health challenge. Personally, they have made my 30 years with Parkinson’s disease more than just sustainable. Living well with Parkinson’s disease takes a variety of skills that must be honed and used. Before I get to trust, let me express the essential weight that faith and hope play when facing illness.

Without faith and hope our internal drive shuts down and leaves us vulnerable to only worsen our condition. We all need to visualize a path for our future, whether it is a leap or a small step. Your path is yours alone and only you can determine the scope of your vision.

When I speak of trust, I mean the belief in oneself as well as believing in others. Trusting that if we follow our gut, listen to our inner voice, and do what we know in our head/heart is a big part of making a good decision. There is much more, though. When it comes to making an informed decision about your medical condition, it is best if you’ve done the research as well. You may want to consult those around you for their opinion.

Trusting your doctor’s decisions, his or her pharmaceutical suggestions, surgical outlook, or any other decision will require your educated consent. You have the free will to reject or accept your doctor’s suggestions. Trust can only go so far when questioning your doctor. You must weigh the pros and cons of the proposed medicines and possible procedures. Providing cogent reasons and facts for why you are adamant about going against a doctor’s wishes needs to be thought out and be thoroughly researched. Depending upon the severity of the recommendation, a second or third opinion may be needed, despite the trust.

Diligence means making use of your time and taking care of yourself. There are things that you can do for yourself that even your doctor can’t. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle and keeping a schedule take discipline but can be very helpful when structuring your day. If you take medicines every day, structure is crucial to stay on time when administering medicines.

There was a time when we didn’t question our doctor’s advice, but with greater access to information and a better understanding of therapies, nutrition, exercise, diet, meditation, reiki and more, there is real opportunity to work with your doctor. As a constant seeker of information about improving your condition, you become a resource for your doctor and are empowered with knowledge that may unveil new options for your future.

Being Malleable Opens Potential Benefit!

Rigidity in thought and body may go hand in hand. Rigidity can be many people’s main complaint when they are first diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. Keeping active, moving, exercise, and stretching are just a few of the tools to keep in mind when your body starts to stiffen up.

As we age, it gets easier and easier to become so convinced that there is only one way to do something. When we get to this mentality that there is only one correct answer, we may be shorting ourselves of new pathways and seeking new alternatives. The sooner that we accept the way we used to do a certain task may have changed, the sooner we can create a plan to identify and try a new method. Flexibility in body, mind, and attitude are necessary when considering what it is you want to tweak with your illness. Sometimes, it may take a slight increase in medication to improve your on-time and reduce symptoms of the disease. Sometimes, thinking outside the usual structure of traditional medicine can be fruitful.

Had I not incorporated reiki, massage, meditation, qigong, yoga, exercise, and reflexology, all in to my life, I honestly don’t know where I’d be. I can tell you this, at first, I was not a believer. It took a leap of faith and necessity to get there. Had I not gone outside my comfort zone, I would never have benefited from these various therapies

For those who question the true benefits of complementary therapies, I ask this: Don’t you think that these therapies might have some merit if they’ve been around for hundreds to thousands of years? Is skepticism holding you back from trying something new? Is it time? Is it money? What holds you back from exploring new options of helping yourself?

Adding a new practice, therapy, or routine to your health regimen takes some investigation, research, and commitment. Keeping positive and remaining hopeful are beneficial in whatever you choose to try.

Depending upon your choice of therapy, it may be important to confirm with your physician, neurologist, or specialist, just to be safe. I am not a doctor! I am a Parkinson’s patient of over 30 years that can declare benefit and relief from these therapies.

Healing Becomes a Prime Time Show

Healing Becomes a Prime Time Show

The world is shifting faster and even more progressively to complementary medicine, than I would ever have imagined. While late-night television channel surfing, I found a program that appears to be both informative and comforting. This new show is on a channel that I rarely watch. Home to numerous reality and family related dramas, TLC is not a station that usually offers programming that thrills me. I will admit that this show really interests me.

I came across a new show called, The Healer. Let me say that as a Parkinson’s patient and a reiki master, I use the term “healer” very rarely and very carefully. I had to see what TLC was doing with someone who had the ego and gift of restoring one to health. To use the word “healer” takes on a serious responsibility.

Charlie, an Australian entrepreneur, has been using his “gift” for several years and seems to deliver results with varying success. Charlie admits that results may depend upon the malady and the severity of it. I respect that he takes his gift so seriously. He freely admits that some illnesses may not respond well to his energy work, while some may react better. I also like that he shares his gift at no charge.

Doctors on the show are amazed, without explanation, yet appear to be willing to make the mind-shift that energy work may have merit. They are witnesses of the inexplicable. The doctors don’t deny that after Charlie’s treatment, something substantial has just occurred for their patient. Skepticism is understandable from the medical community, but when they see results from complimentary therapies, they should be willing to acknowledge them. One of the biggest dilemmas facing energy workers and the medical community is that if they both worked together, the patient may very well see surprising new results and at minimal cost.

I have seen slightly over one episode so far. I am an energy worker. I find the delving and unveiling of energy work on prime time television as a huge leap in the right direction! Shows like this demystify and shed light on the benefits of touch. This television program helps to show that hands on work has much to offer. In the United States, patients are less likely to pursue energy workers. In my opinion, the reason that many doctor(s) discount or don’t understand the potential benefit of working with energy practitioners is that little to no research has been funded.

Not until seven years into my diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease, at the age of 32 was I introduced to Reiki. From day one, I went from skeptic to believer, immediately. After experiencing what I had so easily discounted, it turned out to be something life-changing. Reiki hasn’t healed me to where I am void of symptoms.  I do know, not scientifically, that Reiki has made my life considerably better, increased my quality of life, and slowed my Parkinson’s progression over these last 20 years!

What does Thanksgiving mean to you?

For me, the holiday resonates with special memories of the whole family watching parades, football, and eating my late mother’s exceptional cooking. Those memories are treasures that line the walls of my Thanksgiving box for the rest of eternity. Those days are long past, but I am still fortunate to make special new memories with dear friends who mean so much to me. Times change, life moves quickly forward, and I am forced to accept change.

I think a keystone of this holiday is about one thing only, gratitude. In the hustle and bustle of shopping, cooking, pre-Christmas preparation, and Black Friday sales, the meaning of Thanksgiving gets blurred.

This year, I have lost more dear friends, neighbors, and close Parkinson’s disease colleagues than I can count on my fingers. Loss of loved ones, both friends and family are so bittersweet as I rejoice in having been part of their lives, yet mourn that those days have ended.

As the year quickly ends, I am ever so grateful for my wife and best friend, Angela, my wacky and hilarious chocolate lab, Lily, my relatives all across the United States, my dear Reiki and Parkinson’s families, and you the reader/subscriber who takes time out of your busy day to read my latest blog post. I am grateful!

Thank You!

Happy Thanksgiving!

10 Tips to Improving Your Life with Parkinson’s Disease and Other Health Conditions

10 Tips to Improving Your Life with Parkinson’s Disease and Other Health Conditions

Parkinson’s disease is an illness that may require varying strategies. It may take new and different tactics to work with the ever-evolving changes that may pop up over time. Here are a few pieces of advice to consider as they may help you as they have helped me:

10) Intake Matters – Consider everything that you put into your body. Stay hydrated! Eat as cleanly as you can (local organic fresh vegetables, balanced diet, pay attention to your nutrition) and going easy on processed foods. Try reducing and even eliminating soft drinks. Avoid artificial sweeteners! Diet and Parkinson’s disease seem to go together; which makes complete sense, as reams of research seem to point to the gut as a possible culprit for the illness. Since going vegetarian, by vastly reducing my soft drink intake, increasing my water consumption, and reducing my reliance on processed foods, I have noticed digestion and medication absorption both, seem to have improved.

9) Keeping Social and Well – Informed – Creating and maintaining a social life keeps you involved, knowledgeable, engaged, and active. A social network and/or a support group is an opportunity to connect with other like-minded individuals who are dealing with your condition. Sharing information together provides you with a resource for experience and wisdom from those who are living with illness as well as those who are caring for loved ones. Having a sounding-board of experienced people can be very helpful when trying to learn about medications, navigate local resources, find therapies, and share stories about your health care providers. Seek support!

8) Lowering Your Stress Level and Keeping Anxiety Down – There are techniques and complementary therapies like massage, yoga, meditation, Reiki, and Tai chi, which can reduce stress anxiety, and calm the mind; these are but a few of the many therapies that you might consider trying. Several of these therapies can help teach breathing techniques and ways to lower anxiety. Finding that balance of your mind, body, and spirit can have a significant impact on your health.

7) Special Doctor – If you have Parkinson’s disease or another kind of movement disorder, find a neurologist who is specially trained as a Movement Disorder Specialist. They have extra training and an understanding in neurological disorders.

6) Keeping Positive – A positive attitude is contagious. Making the choice of staying positive and identifying the good instead of the negative is important to create a healthy and conducive environment. Remember that you have a choice!

5) Gratitude – Hold on to your joy for life and the gratitude for all that is in your life! Appreciate what may seem like small things but really are not, is a good start. Medicine, doctors, clean water and air, a good meal, friends, family, and just being alive are all to be appreciated. Add the awe of a sunrise, a sunset, a good laugh, great conversation, and helping someone else, are all acts to be cherished.

4) Doing What You Can – Do as much as you can, while you can, and maximize your good days! Take advantage of everyday and make the most of them!

3) Be Heard – Get involved in your community through advocacy groups, local organizations, and share your voice about your journey with illness. Educate those around you about your illness and encourage friends and family to learn with you on how to improve the Parkinson’s community.

2) Do Something – If you are in denial, apathetic, or depressed, it may be very difficult to motivate yourself to do what you need to do. It may be helpful to seek help from a counselor or someone who understands depression. This may take small victories and small steps. It may take learning about the disease in small chunks. Know this, that everyone’s journey is different and that you can’t gauge one patient by another. The more proactive and motivated you are, the more prepared you will be. Being flexible and staying open to new opportunities can be very helpful.

1) You are Not Powerless – Realize that you are in the driver’s seat to your healthcare! You must be your own best advocate and make sure that you are doing your very best. Be proactive with conventional medicine, skeptical but open to other non-invasive therapies, and a willingness for change. A little hope and faith can go a long way!

I really do believe that we have the power to help ourselves. We have the power locked inside ourselves, we just need the right key to unlock it. I think it is up to us to find that key.

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