Category Archives: mind body spirit

Farewell and Thanks to Stan Lee!

Heroes come in and out of our lives, often unrecognized and frequently under appreciated. On Monday, it struck me just how important heroes are and the amazing power that comes in looking up to a higher standard. Heroes make us better people. They give us something to aspire to and to be. Heroes inspire us to be more and to achieve more than we might, without them.

I was so struck with shock and sadness to learn of the death of Marvel Comics’ founder and genius, Stan Lee. His biography is almost as amazing as the prolific cadre of characters that he brought to life. There is no repaying the numerous gifts that he has given us, as well as the hours and hours of pleasure, excitement, and joy. As a lover of anything and everything Spider-Man, I would religiously watch those cartoons every weekday at 3: 00.PM, after school.

Spider-Man didn’t ask to be given his special abilities, they were thrust upon him and he made the most of what he could do with his unique gifts. Those of us who have Parkinson’s are in a not so different place, in that having this illness makes one hone, uncover, and expand our own powers. We didn’t ask for Parkinson’s disease to come in to our world, but just like Peter Parker, we incorporate those dramatic alterations and deal with them to the best of our abilities.

I have seen Parkinson’s bring out the best in many people. This illness, as awful as it is, can reveal sides of people that you’ve never seen before. From creativity, to artistic ability, to writing or other revealing abilities, sometimes, out of hardship comes new talents and new strengths.

I didn’t know early in my life that I was going to write books and blogs on Parkinson’s disease. It was Parkinson’s disease that caused me to share my journey of over thirty years with those who may be wondering how to navigate the terrain that I have already walked on. Like, Peter Parker, I have learned and adapted.

Heroes keep us upright and moving forward. They remind us that there is still good in the world, when we need it most. Stan Lee’s iconic heroes will most likely never be duplicated, but thankfully, his gifts of brilliance will live on and on.

It was just Halloween—so let’s talk about it! WHAT SCARES YOU?

What scares you?

If you are anything like me, you probably don’t need a raging lunatic with a butcher knife and a hockey mask to get scared. Maybe a speedy roller coaster or a week or more without sunlight would fit in the category of frightening! Okay, this is pretty much a blog on Parkinson’s disease and I will admit that this illness can be very scary, but it doesn’t have to be terrifying.

Some of our fears are truly justified and are there for a reason. Fears can be mechanisms that remind us not to get too close to a fire or to avoid approaching the lion’s den, but then there are those fears that perpetuate themselves and may get away from us. Fears, like wildfires, can get fanned and grow into severe anxiety, causing more and more negative emotions. Fears of the unknown or visions of our mind that manifest from our sub-conscience may just arise.  When anxiety, frustration, and stress lead into depression or despair, we have a huge problem to resolve, quickly!

Fear is that four letter word that can motivate us or hold us back from fulfilling our destiny and our dreams. People share with me how impressed they are that I wrote a book. As much as I appreciate the praise and well wishes, I tell them that anyone and everyone can write a book. Overcoming the fear to put your story or viewpoints on paper or the web takes some gumption and willingness to be completely frank, yet vulnerable. Just like writing, public speaking is frightening, exhilarating, exhausting, and empowering, all in one.

Some fears are ours to conquer. Some fears are meant to be respected and accepted. Most of us know deep down, which ones are which, but it is when we choose the wrong fear to meddle with, that may cause problems, danger, harm, or insult.

Overcoming our fears is a step-by-step piece of our growth to becoming stronger individuals. A big part of learning and improving ourselves is to expand our knowledge base and to find the tools that may assist us in calming our fears.

Parkinson’s is Still a Mystery!

In Norman Cousins’ book, Anatomy of An Illness, Cousins mentions a placebo study where over eighty percent of the Parkinson’s patients showed improvement. Participants in the study were told that they were receiving a powerful new drug. The pill that they were taking was not a new drug, but the expectation of benefits was strong enough to show improvement. If Parkinson’s is degenerative, wouldn’t you think that the placebo effect wouldn’t work anymore? How is this possible?

Two years ago, after having Parkinson’s symptoms for over thirty years, I experienced twenty-four hours without showing symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. I don’t understand, and I am not so sure that the medical community can explain such an event!

If those neurons that supposedly are dormant, dead, or erased, then someone needs to explain to me how a placebo effect and a Parkinson holiday are still possible! This is a tricky illness that manifests slowly and often very secretively. Often, the first symptoms may be constipation, loss of sense of smell, shoulder or wrist pain, or neck pain.

The latest research points to the gut as being the key culprit for the beginnings of this illness but is Parkinson’s more than one illness? By all the discussions that I have had with experts (many of those living with Parkinson’s and many working in the Parkinson’s disease field), who confirm their belief that it is very likely that we may be dealing with a variety of different illnesses.

A common saying in the Parkinson’s community is that “if you’ve met someone with Parkinson’s then you’ve met someone with Parkinson’s “, meaning that everyone with Parkinson’s is unique. The uniqueness of each and every case and how different each individual deals with a variation of symptoms keeps both patients and their neurologist guessing how to countermove.

Balancing the right diet, maintaining a challenging exercise regimen, and working closely with your neurologist for the right personalized plan are vital pieces to staying on top of my Parkinson’s. We all may respond to something completely different. The key is to discover what the something is that makes that difference for you!

Celebrating Indie Author Day this Saturday October 13!

Angela Robb and Karl Robb 72 dpi

This Saturday, October 13th is National Indie Author Day! Celebrate independent authors and their work at your participating local library!  Authors of all of genres are expected so, check your local library for the details and times.

In our area, the Fairfax County Public Libraries are celebrating this day at two library locations; Pohick Library in Burke and the Patrick Henry Library in Vienna. The Pohick Library in Burke, VA has graciously invited Angela and me to represent our books at the at their indie author event. If you are in the area and want to meet us or purchase a signed book, please stop by to see us Saturday from 1:00 pm-3:00 pm.

Hope to see you there!

We Can Work Through Pressure

Pressure hits us all. Some people thrive under pressure, while others just cannot deal with it. The varying degrees of pressure may depend upon where we are in our lives. When we are hit with multiple stress points in our life, like illness, family issues, concerns about loved ones, financial dealings, or just daily living, pressure will compound.

Unexpected events are going to pop up as we get older.  Factors totally out of our control will try to take a toll, but there are ways to be better prepared for the unexpected obstacles that we may encounter. These are not sure-fire solutions for dealing with pressure, but maybe one or two methods to offer a few moments of solace and peace.

  1. Focusing on your breathing and sitting quietly for brief periods can be calming. Clearing your thoughts from your mind and just focusing on yourself only for a few minutes may help to reduce the pressure.
  2. Relaxation, be it reading a novel, working on a jigsaw puzzle, or listening to your favorite music should not be forgotten or discounted. I am a big fan of music.
  3. Keeping a journal, drawing, singing, looking at photos, or watching your favorite comedy are all ways to relieve the pressure for a brief respite. These are but a few of the variety of options available to us.

Sometimes the pressure in our lives requires outside intervention and we need the help of family, friends, or even professional help. Don’t push away help if you truly need it. We all need help at some point!

Summer Reprise – Tips for Staying Positive and Proactive

This was created in May 2014, but I thought it was worthy of another appearance.

Mountain PeaksHere are some Tips for Staying Positive and Proactive:

  • Take care of yourself. The more you know about Parkinson’s, the better. You play the key role in your own health. Seek out therapies/modalities that work for you. Accepting your illness does not mean giving up.

  • Appreciate the good in every day. Focus on what you can do! Do not focus on what you can’t do! Savor and appreciate everything.

  • Stay flexible in all ways. A rigid pole often tends to break in the wind. A flexible pole will bend and give in the wind. Being more flexible will add a new dimension to your life.

  • A person with a good attitude is much easier to be around and is good for our well-being.

  • Being positive is a choice! When we label everything “good” or “bad”, we lose sight that we cannot savor one without the other. You cannot have the sweet without the bitter. This is life!

  • Explore the stressors in your daily life. Find an outlet to help you release your stress.

  • Procrastination, denial, fear, and apathy only delay the opportunity to begin our own self care. Don’t hesitate to ask for help when you need it.

  • If you don’t laugh every day, start! Laughter has all kinds of health benefits. Don’t take yourself too seriously. Don’t stop laughing!

  • Plan ahead for what you can and be aware and engaged. Always have a plan B, C, or more.

  • The best exercise or activity is the one that you like and you are willing to do. If Parkinson’s prohibits us from doing something we love, then we must find a replacement for that activity.

I hope these are helpful to you.

Karl

Rock Steady Boxing–It’s so much more than just boxing!

I recently joined a Rock Steady Boxing class! The class and the instructor are wonderful! If you have Parkinson’s disease and haven’t tried the Rock Steady Boxing program, I encourage you to find the nearest program in your area. The camaraderie and encouragement amongst the participants is uplifting and inspiring.

The workout is tough, lively, active, loud, motivating, and rewarding. I hate to admit it, but I am getting older. I’m rediscovering muscles that I have not used for a good while. For an hour and a half, the boxers either move through a series of exercise stations made up of quick thinking and moving games, flexibility or core exercises, many of them borrowed from yoga focusing on balance, strength, posture, and mobility. The program is flourishing, as it should. It’s novel, fresh, and effective! This program does something amazing—it makes working out fun again, for me.

Rock Steady Boxing NOVA has been an experience that I did not expect! The whole class has bonded and become a unified group. Everyone supports the other and encourages their fellow boxers. Our coach and leader, Alec, is a charismatic and inspired young man who really strives to make improvements in our class’s lives. 

My first two classes, the workouts kicked my butt! I am happy to say that I can see an improvement in my strength, balance, and overall fitness. Rock Steady Boxing is a welcomed break in my day and week. I see the boxing as a moving meditation. It is a break that I look forward to, as well as seeing my boxing friends and putting on the gloves. I think this program builds your confidence as much as your body. Rock Steady Boxing is like a fast-paced support group that makes you sweat.

If you are looking for an opportunity to get a great workout, build some muscle, make some new friends, and pound some punching-bags, then I encourage you to try Rock Steady Boxing in your area to see if it’s right for you! 

Building a Plan for Your Parkinson’s Disease and Your Health

Without some sort of plan or framework, it is very easy to get lost along the way. Whether you have Parkinson’s disease or not, just having goals may not be enough, as unexpected obstacles can arise at the most inconvenient of times. There is so much in our lives that we can’t expect, but must just accept and move on, as best we can.  Our perspective and flexibility can impact how we deal with adversity.

The following few tips are some thoughts and suggestions that you may want to consider. I hope that these tips might trigger some revelations for you.

  1. Consider building a series of plans from your personal medical team, your support network, your health team (trainer, physical therapist, massage therapist, speech pathologist, etc.). Some of these networks may overlap and vary as your providers may change over time.

  2. Keeping current on developments and timely releases about your illness is not only empowering but beneficial to both you and those who you choose to enlighten.

  3. If you have early onset Parkinson’s disease, I strongly suggest for you to consider finding a Neurologist who is a Movement Disorder Specialist, as they have special training dedicated to this illness.

  4. Don’t compare or contrast your Parkinson’s to anyone else’s. We each have our own flavor of Parkinson’s and we each have our own unique journey.

  5. Timing our medications is a crucial component to making the most of our day. Maintaining and strictly adhering to a timely regimen where your medications can work at their best, takes experimentation and some trial and error.

  6. Try not thinking of illness of any kind as a war, a battle, or a win or loss. Consider illness as an obstacle or an obstruction that must be worked around. No one wins a war. War is dark and violent. Maybe, a new perspective towards illness can take some of the anxiety out of it.

  7. Explore the numerous therapies outside of western medicine to see if you can find one that offers benefit or relief. Get good referrals from friends and family.

  8. Keep an open mind to relinquishing some of the responsibility for the good of lowering your stress level and improving your mental health.

  9. Do what you can, while you can! Whether you are healthy or have illness in your life, consider that our control is limited.

  10. While there is definitive change in our lives and the options may vary or seem more limited, we must recognize that we have more strength and control than we realize.

Nature on Netflix To Wake To, Sleep To, and Enjoy

Bring a bit of peace and beauty into your home! If you are a nature lover and need a calming force that mesmerizes, might I suggest you turn on the captivating vistas of NatureVision TV now on Netflix. Season 3 unveils about 10 hours and 10 episodes of natural world diversity from ocean to jungle.
Whether you meditate with the video and soothing music softly playing in the background or choose to mute the sound just to appreciate the awe of the bounty of creatures and places, this video collection would be great for parties and get togethers. Try using this marvelous collection just as TV art, instead of your TV just being a blank canvas.
If you are a Netflix subscriber and want something unique and attractive to play throughout the day, like moving art, or just want peaceful television to wake and go to bed to, consider this wonderful collection of our planet’s gifts.
I will report more, soon, on other Netflix finds, both nature-related, and not, very soon.

The Magic in Magic!

The Magic isn’t gone, but it is fading fast. The art of magic will never die, but it may become blurred, as new technology replaces the beauty and purity of performance magic. Live magic is just that—it’s magical. When performed correctly and the magician has done his job, the participant feels that the impossible is, possible. Some magicians embarrass or make their audience feel stupidly duped. The magician is meant to impress but not to break the bond between audience and performer. Magic is for everyone: young or old, there is a place to appreciate the grace and fluidity of sleight-of-hand. One should appreciate the trickery of the eyes and misdirection. Cleverness is worth recognition!

The sad reality is that the neighborhood magic store has rapidly gone away for good, only to be replaced by the video game. This dying art has a long history, reaching back to ancient Egypt and possibly even longer. To lose the joy that this art has sprung on so many, and for so long truly is a tragedy, indeed.

I hope that as generations and technology continue to evolve, that the creative minds of those drawn to magic can continue to update and improve upon the wonders of magic. Magic can be reinvented and re-introduced to new audiences in novel ways as materials and new innovations appear.

Keep the Magic Alive!

I have written about the benefit of video games and Parkinson’s disease, but had a deficit of articles on the benefits of performing and practicing magic. I think that aside of the many years of enjoyment of entertaining myself and an occasional audience, magic has given me numerous gifts that I will quantify:

-Magic makes you think in order and organized linear steps.

-Magic forces the performer to communicate, socialize, and be more outgoing.

-Magic helps improve eye-hand coordination and joint flexibility.

-Magic is universal. Magic is entertaining. Magic is sheer fun.

-Magic doesn’t feel like therapy, but maybe it is!

Walt Disney is quoted to have said, “It is fun to do the impossible!” Magic is about making the impossible, possible, even if it’s just for a moment.

 

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

%d bloggers like this: