Category Archives: Philosophy

Remembering Those Before Us!

PD Tulip

As Parkinson’s Disease Awareness Month comes to a close, as one well too familiar with this illness, I am compelled to bring awareness to those who have left us in the struggle. I am so very grateful to have known them and to have shared their stories and their lives. Losing friends, whether it is from PD or not, is a pain that I dread. Yet, death is a fact of life that none of us likes to talk about or truly accept. I am so grateful for the friendship and acceptance that our PD community continues to share. I truly hope that all 12 months become months of Parkinson’s Disease Awareness–not just one!

Stretch and Grow-10 Keys to Maximizing Your Happiness and Growth

  1. Never lose the curiosity and desire to learn more about everything! Science, art, music, history, and the world around us can feed our quest for knowledge and understanding as we continue to learn.

  2. Try picking up a new talent or improving upon an old one. If you enjoyed playing an instrument, performing magic, shuffling and dealing cards, juggling, whistling, telling a joke, then think hard on what would bring you the greatest joy to add to your abilities, and explore it.

  3. As we age, keeping focus becomes more of a challenge. Work on maintaining focus with brain games, puzzles, reading, and even video games.

  4. Singing and keeping conversation are good for voice and concentration.

  5. Challenging yourself and enjoying yourself at the same time, is very satisfying.

  6. Music keeps me inspired, active, and makes my day so much more enjoyable.

  7. I love to-do lists and marking off my completions–it just feels good!

  8. Fear happens to all of us–when we can reduce our fear and anxiety, everything seems to get better.

  9. Giving back and focusing less on ourselves can result in helping everyone involved.

  10. Being bad can be fun–sometimes eating something that makes you smile, turning off the phone for a few hours, or having a late-night ice cream party can reignite the kid in us that we forget sometimes.

Health Matters!

It is April and that means it is Parkinson’s Disease Awareness Month!

Everyday ought to be Parkinson’s Awareness Day! For each and everyone of us who lives with this illness, we know that our awareness is real and constant. Now, bring that awareness to those who you encounter or who are less familiar with this illness. Too often, much to my amazement, I meet people completely unaware of what Parkinson’s is and what it can do. We have got to do a better job of telling the world about this illness, and what it is all about.

I refuse to mix politics and ethics. I try to keep my nose out of politics on this site and provide my readers with a perspective that informs and allows you to make your own decision.

I have seen the life-changing impact that Meals On Wheels has made and continues to make on lives. Just the thought of erasing a program as important as  this one, is heartless, cruel, and the sign of a system that is out of touch and totally unfamiliar with real human needs.

To reduce  funding for the FDA and the NIH reduces our hopes for a speedy breakthrough or drug development. Our health matters and many of the best minds in research and future developments come from these organizations.

The elimination of the EPA could cause numerous devastating changes and have even more repercussions on climate change and various environmental factors that impact genetically sensitive people. The future of the animal kingdom on this planet is in even greater jeopardy, than it is right now.

Speak up! Let your voice be heard!

It is so important to share your story and how governmental decisions impact you and those you love.

Happy Spring!

Sometimes, this is how I feel!

I love Spring, and cannot wait for the weather to retreat! Spring means sun, warmth, and the rebirth of flora and fauna. Greenery galore and the eruption of color come with the season. It means more time outside to explore and take new photographs.

If you are having a less good day, here are a few ways to improve your day:

Aspire

Book, create, initiate, or invite someone or make a plan for something to look forward in the near and distant future. By having something to look forward to (no matter how small), you create a to do item that you can work towards. Maybe you want to see a favorite band in concert or go to your favorite ice cream parlor, you are making plans.

Don’t Hide

Keep social and active! Get out and share information and good times with others!

Get Some Sun-but be cautious

Almost all Parkinson’s disease patients are low in vitamin D. PD patients who take Levadopa may be more be sensitive to sunlight. I see a Dermatologist at least once a year and suggest that you see one at least for a once a year checkup.

Some days are better than others–just remember that tomorrow is another day!

In Reference To My Art (up above)

Allergies, neck pain/headache, morning slowness, sinus congestion, post nasal drip, and cough all may come with the pollen explosion that comes with this time of year. I tend to not drink enough water and keep hydrated. I’m trying to drink more water. Stay hydrated!

My Chocolate Lab, Lily, is quite a teacher!

If you are an animal lover, dog or cat person, intuitive, or just simply aware, these observations may not be as eye-opening as some of my epiphanies, but here are some of the observations, realized from living with Lily:

1. In her eyes, if I’m having a less good day, all she wants to do is be with me and make my day better.

2. Parkinson’s symptoms don’t disturb her. She loves me for who I am and what I am. I am part of her pack, no matter what.

3. When times are stressful or anxious, Lily is waiting in the wings with her ball or stuffed toy, to make me laugh or break the mood with a game of catch or fetch.

4. She reminds me not to take myself so seriously.

5. She reminds me that you can say an awful lot with just your eyes. Words are not always necessary to get your message across. 

Valentine’s Day Rules

 

Valentine's Day

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Valentine’s Day is a wonderful reason to tell the people who you care about most, how you feel about them.

  2. Don’t confuse romance novels and Hollywood’s portrayal of fictional love, to be reality.

  3. Valentine’s Day is just that–a day. Do not take your loved one for granted.

  4. Flowers, cards, and chocolates are fleeting representations of your Love.

  5. A kind word, gesture, or act means so much more than stuff.

  6. Far too often, we think that gifts might replace our words and emotions, but they can’t.

  7.  Don’t let bling get in the way of the meaning of Love.

  8. When words get hard to express, leave it to Shakespeare, Emerson, Thoreau, Gershwin, Sinatra, Carmen McRae, Boston, or your favorite band, to say it for you.

  9. Good food, drink, conversation, and music make everything better.

Respite

RespiteWe all need to pay close attention to our health. It is so easy to be encumbered and engrossed in our work and lose sight of ourselves. We owe it to ourselves, for the preservation of our clarity of thought and refreshing of the body to vacate from the office. Taking time for yourself isn’t a luxury–it’s a necessity! Just taking a few minutes more, every day, can make a difference in your mood, your creativity, and overall well-being.

Photo Creation — Orb 3D

I was experimenting with my phone camera and created this–I hope that you enjoy it! I call it Orb 3D.

If you think it’s cool, please share it. I am trying to keep active and creative and believe it is vital to staying well. Explore your creativity!

Taken by Karl Robb

Taken by Karl Robb

The Eyes Have It–Perspective!

Sky view!Angle, intent, and outlook all sway our perspective. Even when using the best of our senses, there are times when our emotions interfere with our rationale. Keeping a cool head and paying attention to our inner voice might be the extra sense in determining perspective.

This photo over Dallas shows a whole other side of a city that I had never seen before (I was lucky to capture it.). I discovered an amazing and fresh look at a city I thought that I knew well, but now see it clearer and with fresh eyes.

Try, just for today, looking at something that you do or look at everyday, and apply this philosophy. See if you appreciate what you look at, a little more.

You might be pleasantly surprised.

It’s not all in your head–is it?

It might all be connected.In the near 200 years, since the discovery of Parkinson’s Disease (PD), the theories of how, where, when, and why the illness develops varies over time. Science is proving and re-enforcing the belief that everything is connected. When I was officially diagnosed in 1991 with PD, there were only a few doctors who pondered the connection between the gut and the brain. Now, there seems to be a much larger contingent who agree that our gut plays a major factor in our brain function.

The body has a mysterious way of masking itself or maybe it is just due to the complexity of the brain. For several years, my right shoulder rotator cuff hurt and I was unable to find long-lasting relief or an answer to where the pain was coming from. I had seen doctors, taken X-rays, seen massage therapists, and done physical therapy, and all proved to do little, over time. I was sure the pain resided in the shoulder. I was wrong.

I had to go all the way across the United States to find relief. A knowledgeable and very intuitive massage therapist who really paid attention to my arm discovered a very sore spot close to the mid point of my upper arm. Once she released the extreme pain that had been stored in that one spot, the pain in my shoulder dispersed. I would call the results near miraculous. She found the cause of my pain where no one had even thought of looking.

I think that this is sound evidence that there is just so much about the systems of the human body that we just can’t understand, just yet. Over time, new discoveries and breakthroughs may very well reveal astounding relationships between our systems or even unveil how our bodies process certain chemicals and alter our central nervous system. Until the day comes that modern science is capable of unveiling an all encompassing cure, it is our responsibility for exploring our own systemic connections, the roles that stress and anxiety play in our lives, our diets, our sleep patterns, and even how we think, feel, and react.

Our mind, body, and spirit depend upon one another. Maintaining that delicate balance is the key to our health. Finding the missing pieces that might lead us to fulfill the balance may require exploration and investigation outside our comfort zone and even that of our complete understanding. What I thought originated in my shoulder was actually being manipulated by a sore spot in my upper arm, a spot about a half a foot away. Looking closely at ourselves, with a fresh lens can reveal a great deal.

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