Adding our books to libraries!

Please help us get in your local library!

Six copies of A Soft Voice in a Noisy World are in the Fairfax County Public Library! If you are in Northern Virginia and want to read this book from the library, 6 copies are available for your convenience.

We are excited about making our latest book, Dealing and Healing with Parkinson’s Disease and Other Health Conditions, available as well!

If you would like for your local library to have copies available in your area or are interested in our recently released workbook, Dealing and Healing with Parkinson’s and Other Health Conditions please have your local library contact us or send us your library information.

Contact us at asoftvoice@gmail.com or call us at 772-444-7622. Thank You!
A Soft Voice in a Noisy World

A Moment of Nature

Take a minute to enjoy!Pure Beauty

Respite

RespiteWe all need to pay close attention to our health. It is so easy to be encumbered and engrossed in our work and lose sight of ourselves. We owe it to ourselves, for the preservation of our clarity of thought and refreshing of the body to vacate from the office. Taking time for yourself isn’t a luxury–it’s a necessity! Just taking a few minutes more, every day, can make a difference in your mood, your creativity, and overall well-being.

Photo Creation — Orb 3D

I was experimenting with my phone camera and created this–I hope that you enjoy it! I call it Orb 3D.

If you think it’s cool, please share it. I am trying to keep active and creative and believe it is vital to staying well. Explore your creativity!

Taken by Karl Robb

Taken by Karl Robb

The Eyes Have It–Perspective!

Sky view!Angle, intent, and outlook all sway our perspective. Even when using the best of our senses, there are times when our emotions interfere with our rationale. Keeping a cool head and paying attention to our inner voice might be the extra sense in determining perspective.

This photo over Dallas shows a whole other side of a city that I had never seen before (I was lucky to capture it.). I discovered an amazing and fresh look at a city I thought that I knew well, but now see it clearer and with fresh eyes.

Try, just for today, looking at something that you do or look at everyday, and apply this philosophy. See if you appreciate what you look at, a little more.

You might be pleasantly surprised.

It’s not all in your head–is it?

It might all be connected.In the near 200 years, since the discovery of Parkinson’s Disease (PD), the theories of how, where, when, and why the illness develops varies over time. Science is proving and re-enforcing the belief that everything is connected. When I was officially diagnosed in 1991 with PD, there were only a few doctors who pondered the connection between the gut and the brain. Now, there seems to be a much larger contingent who agree that our gut plays a major factor in our brain function.

The body has a mysterious way of masking itself or maybe it is just due to the complexity of the brain. For several years, my right shoulder rotator cuff hurt and I was unable to find long-lasting relief or an answer to where the pain was coming from. I had seen doctors, taken X-rays, seen massage therapists, and done physical therapy, and all proved to do little, over time. I was sure the pain resided in the shoulder. I was wrong.

I had to go all the way across the United States to find relief. A knowledgeable and very intuitive massage therapist who really paid attention to my arm discovered a very sore spot close to the mid point of my upper arm. Once she released the extreme pain that had been stored in that one spot, the pain in my shoulder dispersed. I would call the results near miraculous. She found the cause of my pain where no one had even thought of looking.

I think that this is sound evidence that there is just so much about the systems of the human body that we just can’t understand, just yet. Over time, new discoveries and breakthroughs may very well reveal astounding relationships between our systems or even unveil how our bodies process certain chemicals and alter our central nervous system. Until the day comes that modern science is capable of unveiling an all encompassing cure, it is our responsibility for exploring our own systemic connections, the roles that stress and anxiety play in our lives, our diets, our sleep patterns, and even how we think, feel, and react.

Our mind, body, and spirit depend upon one another. Maintaining that delicate balance is the key to our health. Finding the missing pieces that might lead us to fulfill the balance may require exploration and investigation outside our comfort zone and even that of our complete understanding. What I thought originated in my shoulder was actually being manipulated by a sore spot in my upper arm, a spot about a half a foot away. Looking closely at ourselves, with a fresh lens can reveal a great deal.

Are you stuck?

In a rut?Is your ship at sea but can’t make it to port,
Do you play the game but your putt is just too short,
Are you stuck in a vortex that you can’t escape,
Are you stuck in minutia and wrapped in red tape,
It’s time to break free and break the trend,
Begin a new pattern and create a new message to send,
Take a fresh tact, chart a new path and go round the bend.

Change begins with one small step. That small step can feel like a huge leap, but sometimes to move ahead we must be willing to break out of our comfort zone.

Some Rediscovered Observations–Worth Sharing

PathwayHere are some thoughts and tips that I wrote down awhile back and found again-I hope that they are    helpful:

1. It is a new year–full of exciting opportunities to explore. Keep your options open and remain flexible to new possibilities. Be open and a little cautious,too.

2. Keeping a positive and hopeful outlook isn’t always easy for some of us. Following through the hardest times makes even the smallest joys of life that much sweeter.

3. Staying social and active are crucial to anyone facing an illness. The stronger your support team–the stronger you are!

4. Diet, sleep, and stress can alter everything–it’s up to you how you monitor them.

5. Stay focused and on track. Targeting a cause can pinpoint your goal and keep you motivated and clear.

6. Embrace the day–there is no need to attack it.

Please share it–if you like it.

 

Remembering 2016!

2017! The Parkinson’s Disease (PD) Community lost 2 of its best known iconic figures in 2016. The most recognizable figure on the planet, the boxing legend and humanitarian, Mohamed Ali and Janet Reno, the first  US female Attorney General. Thanks to both of them for their awareness and advocacy in spreading the word on PD and the importance of educating the public, our government, and the medical world. They were very public faces who helped to express the needs of this community.

This year I have been to far too many funerals of dear friends who have succumbed to the symptoms of PD. It is a tragic reality– one, that I dread sharing with you.

It is my hope for 2017, that we see more cooperation from all parties involved in drug manufacturing, drug regulation, and drug research to lead to some understanding of just how our brains work. Someone, somewhere, sometime in the not so distant future is going to recognize a common element or link that may very well break open the mystery of Parkinson’s disease. Until that very special day, when the brain reveals itself, it is our duty to ourselves and our loved ones, to do all that we can for ourselves and our conditions.

I wish all of you, my friends and readers, a very healthy and happy New Year!

Happy Holidaze!

 This time of year it’s hard to be right, some sing carols or Silent Night.

There is but one phrase to cover your back, whether you’re Jewish or Christian, it’ll cover the slack.

Politically safe and correct is this phrase, wishing you well by saying Happy Holidays!

Thanks to all of you for reading my writing. I’d love to hear from you, if you have comments or suggestions for future posts.

Back soon,

                                            Karl

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