Blog Archives

Adding our books to libraries!

Please help us get in your local library!

Six copies of A Soft Voice in a Noisy World are in the Fairfax County Public Library! If you are in Northern Virginia and want to read this book from the library, 6 copies are available for your convenience.

We are excited about making our latest book, Dealing and Healing with Parkinson’s Disease and Other Health Conditions, available as well!

If you would like for your local library to have copies available in your area or are interested in our recently released workbook, Dealing and Healing with Parkinson’s and Other Health Conditions please have your local library contact us or send us your library information.

Contact us at asoftvoice@gmail.com or call us at 772-444-7622. Thank You!
A Soft Voice in a Noisy World

Remembering 2016!

2017! The Parkinson’s Disease (PD) Community lost 2 of its best known iconic figures in 2016. The most recognizable figure on the planet, the boxing legend and humanitarian, Mohamed Ali and Janet Reno, the first  US female Attorney General. Thanks to both of them for their awareness and advocacy in spreading the word on PD and the importance of educating the public, our government, and the medical world. They were very public faces who helped to express the needs of this community.

This year I have been to far too many funerals of dear friends who have succumbed to the symptoms of PD. It is a tragic reality– one, that I dread sharing with you.

It is my hope for 2017, that we see more cooperation from all parties involved in drug manufacturing, drug regulation, and drug research to lead to some understanding of just how our brains work. Someone, somewhere, sometime in the not so distant future is going to recognize a common element or link that may very well break open the mystery of Parkinson’s disease. Until that very special day, when the brain reveals itself, it is our duty to ourselves and our loved ones, to do all that we can for ourselves and our conditions.

I wish all of you, my friends and readers, a very healthy and happy New Year!

Happy Holidaze!

 This time of year it’s hard to be right, some sing carols or Silent Night.

There is but one phrase to cover your back, whether you’re Jewish or Christian, it’ll cover the slack.

Politically safe and correct is this phrase, wishing you well by saying Happy Holidays!

Thanks to all of you for reading my writing. I’d love to hear from you, if you have comments or suggestions for future posts.

Back soon,

                                            Karl

Holiday Giveaway! 2 New Books Will Be Won!

Enter to Win a copy of Dealing and Healing

Enter to Win a copy of Dealing and Healing

Just in time for the holiday season, we are giving away 2 copies of our latest book, Dealing and Healing with Parkinson’s Disease and Other Health Conditions: A Workbook for Body, Mind, and Spirit will randomly award a copy to some lucky follower.

To be eligible for this drawing, all you have to do is follow me on Amazon and click the link below:

https://giveaway.amazon.com/p/312ec68fc3143286

GOOD LUCK!

Motivation

What gets you out of bed every day?
What makes you happy?
What inspires you?

Every day may be about small victories.

They count.

Be proud of your achievements.

Don’t discount yourself or what you accomplish.

Out of Control

Out Of ControlParkinson’s Disease agonist medications (Requip and Mirapex) have been shown to cause compulsive behavior for some users. Some users have been shown to be prone to gambling addiction, sex addiction, shopping addiction, food addiction, and gaming addiction may occur. Compulsion may even entice users to go beyond legal limits to feed their desire or lose sense of time.

If you find yourself facing any kind of compulsive behavior that may be taking you away from friends and family, or is disrupting your life, tell your neurologist and someone close to you about breaking the cycle. Communication is so vital to your well-being. Carrying secrets only fuels the tension and stress on the mind and body. Letting go and making a change (with your neurologist’s help) might just be the right move forward.

Winter Can Be Cruel

Cold WinterAs a child, I used to love winter. I would sled and ski and didn’t give the bitter cold a second thought. Now, I am less oblivious and less tolerant of the cold. My body functions and just moves more freely in warmer climates. Cold seems to cause greater constriction of the joints and even the muscles.

Winter doesn’t just bring on change of the physical body but with light changes and shorter days, the changes may impact your mood. Keep a close eye on your daily attitude and if you experience thoughts or feelings that you need to express (sadness, possible depression, or anger) consider getting help and stay on top of it, before it manifests into something you can’t control.

Happy Thanksgiving 2016

Another Thanksgiving comes this year, time to share all that I treasure to be near and dear ,
There is so much that I cherish–family, friends, and more. I am thankful from my head to my core!
Beloved Shadow has left usGiving Thanks!-a companion to be forever missed,
A cat like none other–fickle and funny–you get the gist.
Book two has been written and released, we hope our readers are informed and pleased.
It is my hope that this finds you with a positive attitude and well,  on this day of gorging and gratitude.
Life is good for me and I hope for you. I hope this day is special, whatever you might do!

Something to consider for National Caregivers’ Month!

PD Tulip!

PD Tulip!

It’s National Caregivers’ Month–in honor, I am recycling one of my oldie but goodies! I hope it helps! This is a gentle reminder to all the selfless caregivers (I prefer the term carepartner), carepartners, doctors, nurses, orderlies, therapists, speech pathologists, social workers, and anyone who comes in contact with people touched by a neurological illness. Remember these 5 important points before you react, speak, take offense, lose your temper, or give up:

Everyone has a history and a story. The person who you are dealing with now has had and may still have a very full life that you only see a portion. Give them the credit and respect that they are due.

-The current state of the patient that you are seeing doesn’t need more stress, tension, or conflict in their lives, working together you both can make life better for the patient– and not worse.

-Give your loved one or patient flexibility and deal with them creatively and with an open mind. If they aren’t responding to medications, offer music therapy, complementary therapies, or seek a personal solution which motivates the patient. There is a need for gentleness and understanding.
-The person with whom you are interacting may have done some important things in their life: raised a family, changed many lives, and been far more active than they are now. Their current condition is not by choice. Show compassion, patience, caring, and generosity. Remaining centered, patient, and mindful is good for both patient and carepartner.

-A mutual respect and understanding is crucial for needs to be met and for the caregiver/carepartner to be appreciated.
-Someday, in the not so distant future, you or someone who you care deeply for, could be facing health challenges.

11 Wishes for Doctors’ Offices!

Dream

Welcome to my wishlist of what could be, in a future world. Come dream with me:

11. I wish doctors had the same epiphany as Jerry Maguire: Fewer clients/patients and more personalized care.

10. I wish that every doctor in the practice sat in the lobby for a minimum of 2 hours to experience the uncomfortable furniture, the noise of the waiting room, and the need for a more soothing environment.

9. I wish that doctors would call their own switchboards to hear how difficult it is to try and navigate the bevy of options to choose from, wait in the cue for 25 minutes, and then get dropped, forcing you to either give up or start all over again.

8. I wish doctors evaluated the whole experience from phone call to waiting room to appointment from the patients’ viewpoint and took that into consideration.

7. I wish it weren’t so impossible to reach a doctor, when needed.

6. I wish doctors and staff listened better than they do.

5. I wish doctors’’ offices were more warm, inviting, bright, and welcoming.

4. I wish there were a separate waiting room for anyone with a contagion.

3. I wish doctors at least provided coffee or water to patients.

2. I wish doctors actually called their patients to check on them.

1. I wish telemedicine becomes an option for everyone, so that we can save time, money, stress, gas, gridlock, and frustration!

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