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Getting What You Need-Support

 

For the first 7 years of being diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, I didn’t see a need, nor did I have a strong desire to join a Parkinson’s disease support group. When I moved to the suburbs, my neurologist, at the time, encouraged me to see what support groups could offer. After attending meetings of a few support groups, my wife, Angela, and I envisioned what we wanted in a group. In a very short period, I went from avoiding Parkinson’s support groups to speaking at them and even starting one of my own. My wife and I ran our support group for a dozen years. I learned so much from so many amazing people. As much as I thought that I didn’t need a support group, it turned out, that I really did.

The reality is that a well-run support group offers camaraderie, information, and a wisdom that comes from so many, all in one place. A support group can show you what is working and what to avoid, doctor information and feedback, available classes that pertain to Parkinson’s, local therapists, caregiver support, Parkinson’s news, and speakers in your area. When you find a good group, it feels like another family and a place that you belong. A strong network of family and friends is crucial to your health and wellness, no matter what the illness.

Some support groups may not match your personality or may not be the kind of group that you feel comfortable with, right now. I wanted a group that focused on the sharing of information and left me more empowered than when I came in. We made a lot of friends, shared both the good times and the rocky times, and provided one-another moral support. Despite our age differences and unique situations, we all learned together and bonded together into a cohesive unit for most of the group’s longevity.

We Are All In This Together

Knowing that you aren’t alone, is so important. Something as small as telling someone that you are thinking of them or that they matter to you can save another’s life. Knowing that people are thinking about you and caring about you is so empowering. Just a simple quick text, an email, a phone call, or a good old-fashioned greeting card can make a huge impact.

Care-giving has its stressful moments. We all need a break. Taking time for ourselves is not selfish-it’s a precious necessity. Your self-care makes you a healthier more helpful contributor.

Helping Ourselves Helps Those Close To Us

Patient or caregiver, there is no shame in admitting that you need help. It takes a strong person to go outside his or her comfort zone. Tell someone close to you what you are feeling and to let them find assistance for you.

I am not an expert on mental health nor am I a doctor. This is not medical advice; it is only what I have seen for over the 30 plus years of having Parkinson’s disease. I have observed friends struggle, who may have benefited from this kind of help. If you see a friend in need, reach out and offer that help. You may be saving a life.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 800-273-8255 or 988 in the USA. Go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_suicide_crisis_lines for an international list of hotlines.

 

Ideas For The New Year

 

Fresh Starts Aren’t Always Necessary

It’s a new year and the thought of those resolutions on the club napkin are but distant memories. Seriously, resolutions can be wonderful intentions yet only to create a burden that wasn’t the intention in the first place. If you are truly goal-oriented, resolutions are simply extensions of those goals that are nagging you the most.

Making Priorities

My biggest battle with my body and mind as I age with Parkinson’s disease is prioritizing:

  • Contending with what I should do and what I don’t want to do.
  • Weeding out projects that I really want to do but know I shouldn’t do.
  • Identifying what I can let go of.
  • There are things I must let go of just to get better.

 There are sacrifices for one reason or another that we all must make. Illness doesn’t always influence our important decisions, but it can most assuredly be a contributor to the making of those decisions.

Drive

Illness provides a perspective for many of us, due to a pushing drive and a boosted sense of urgency. The only solution to quelling the nagging feeling, is fulfilling that drive to produce.

Trimming and Expanding

Most resolutions includes weight loss, health, reading more, less television, or a making more of or a reducing of something. Wanting to improve ourselves is the right direction to go, but if we go overboard, it may have a reverse effect and cause us stress, anxiety, and or tension. We must be careful to ensure that we aren’t doing ourselves a disservice by taking on too much. Knowing our stress level and not exceeding it is crucial to our well-being. Keep your stress level in mind as you monitor your health regimen and overall wellness. Be kind and forgiving to yourself whether you fall off the diet, or not. Stay committed to your projects of 2020! Best of luck!

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