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10 Tips for Staying Positive and Proactive

DSC_0956

Watching dogs play in the snow made me laugh!

Here are 10 Tips for Staying Positive and Proactive

  • Take care of yourself. The more you know about Parkinson’s, the better. You play the key role in your own health. Seek out therapies/modalities that work for you. Accepting your illness does not mean giving up.
  • Appreciate the good in every day. Focus on what you can do, not what you can’t do. Savor and appreciate everything.
  • Stay flexible in all ways. A rigid pole often tends to break in the wind. A flexible pole will bend and give in the wind. Being more flexible will add a new dimension to your life.
  • A person with a good attitude is much easier to be around and is good for our well-being.
  • Being positive is a choice! When we label everything “good” or “bad”, we lose sight that we cannot savor one without the other. You cannot have the sweet without the bitter. This is life!
  • Explore the stressors in your daily life. Find an outlet to help you release your stress.
  • Procrastination, denial, fear, and apathy only delay the opportunity to begin our own self care. Don’t hesitate to ask for help when you need it.
  • If you don’t laugh every day, start! Laughter has all kinds of health benefits. Don’t take yourself too seriously. Don’t stop laughing!
  • Plan ahead for what you can and be aware and engaged. Always have a plan B, C, or more.
  • The best exercise or activity is the one that you like and you are willing to do. If Parkinson’s prohibits us from doing something we love, then we must find a replacement for that activity.

Click this link for the 10 Tips PDF to share.

Library Book Offer For A Soft Voice in A Noisy World

Library Program Offer
I am so thankful to you, my readers that I would like to extend an offer. A year ago, I donated 5 copies of my book to the Fairfax County Public Library. If you would like to make this book available to your local library, please have your library contact me or send me their contact information. This is a wonderful way to share important information!
If you would to like your library to participate, please have them contact me by sending the librarian name, library name, phone number, email, and address of the library. Thank you for your interest!

Happy wins!

When given the choice of being right or happy, happy usually wins out.

10 Tips for Staying Positive and Proactive

I recently developed this list for the Parkinson’s Wellness Chapter in Cincinnati (http://www.parkinsonswellness.org/) OH.   I thought I should make it available to all of you, so here’s the list:

10 Tips for Staying Positive and Proactive

  • Take care of yourself. The more you know about Parkinson’s, the better. You play the key role in your own health. Seek out therapies/modalities that work for you. Accepting your illness does not mean giving up.
  • Appreciate the good in every day. Focus on what you can do, not what you can’t do. Savor and appreciate everything.
  • Stay flexible in all ways. A rigid pole often tends to break in the wind. A flexible  pole will bend and give in the wind. Being more flexible will add a new dimension to your life.
  • A person with a good attitude is much easier to be around and is good for our well-being.
  • Being positive is a choice! When we label everything “good” or “bad”, we lose sight that we cannot savor one without the other. You cannot have the sweet without the bitter. This is life!
  • Explore the stressors in your daily life. Find an outlet to help you release your stress.
  • Procrastination, denial, fear, and apathy only delay the opportunity to begin our own self care. Don’t hesitate to ask for help when you need it.
  • If you don’t laugh every day, start! Laughter has all kinds of health benefits. Don’t take yourself too seriously. Don’t stop laughing!
  • Plan ahead for what you can and be aware and engaged. Always have a plan B, C, or more.
  • The best exercise or activity is the one that you like and you are willing to do. If Parkinson’s prohibits us from doing something we love, then we must find a replacement for that activity.

I hope these are helpful to you.

Karl

Don’t Label Me Or My Illness

It is ingrained in western culture not to question the authority of the doctor.  There is no doubt that doctors provide a vital and life-saving service but there are times, especially if you are dealing with life and death situations, that you have the right to question your doctor. If you rely solely on your doctor’s advice and treatment you may very well be cheating yourself of improving your condition.

Although they don’t scream it, scientists and doctors don’t fully understand the total complexity of the human body and brain. It is a lack of understanding that I believe repeals the doctor’s right to project into the crystal ball and predict a patient’s future outcome.

You must do your part in getting better.  Feeling better and getting better begins with a mind shift that you know that you can get better.  The medical community in general  believes that people with Parkinson’s only get worse–period.  They provide little hope for improving  one’s  condition and add that this illness is both chronic and degenerative.  I have yet to hear of a doctor who prescribes hope and positive  thinking to his patients.  Positive thinking and hope get people  through  amazing traumatic events every day. Feats of super-human strength in times of crisis, heroism under severe pressure, survival under extreme conditions, and the ability to push the body even beyond the breaking point are just some of the unexplained medical phenomenon that science can’t fully dissect. 

Programming can be as dangerous as it is powerful. When a patient is diagnosed with any illness and the doctor tells a patient that there is “no hope” , the negative reinforcement can have devastating consequences on the patient’s whole being.  Had the doctor said, “We have no medical answer for your illness at this time, I suggest you investigate  other potential therapies that may benefit you that western culture has yet to embrace but shows great promise.”  Of course, you probably won’t hear this from most doctors. Shifting the standard outlook from grim to hopeful  could revolutionize medicine and improve the lives of the ill seeking a cure or just a better life. There is power in keeping positive.

5 Ways To Get More Positive

1. Avoid negative influences of those around you!

Try to identify what and who drains your energy and see if you can’t change the way you interact. Learn to control stress through deep breathing, yoga, and meditation.

2. Moderate your television and media!

Avoid tragic news that only weighs you down and has any spiritual or uplifting value. Turn off reality shows that don’t make you feel inspired. Focus on you and what you can change for the better.

3. Visualize yourself getting better every day.

Seeing yourself getting stronger and having that picture in your head is a good place to start for improvement.

4. Clear your mind and body as best you can.

Finding a therapy like Reiki, massage, acupuncture, reflexology, exercise, or other modality may set you on a path to feeling better clearing out toxins in both the mind and body.

5. Help someone else.

When you help others you feel good about what you have accomplished. Making a difference in someone else’s life makes an impact on yours as well.

These are just a few ideas of how to be more positive but I’m sure that you can come up with many more.

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