Blog Archives

Does the Parkinson’s Profile Exist?

I have been fortunate to meet hundreds of people over these thirty plus years with Parkinson’s disease (PD) at numerous events. After a while, you notice more and more about yourself and those around you. It’s a question that I have been asking for years: Is there a firm personality profile, specifically for people who get or are more likely to get Parkinson’s disease (PD)?

Many of the neurologists that I have shared the idea with, have told me that there wasn’t a profile, while an occasional doctor thought that I might be on to something. I have always had a curious mind and having met so many people from around the world with PD, it has given me an opportunity to make some non-scientific observations and even a rough hypothesis. Here are a few of my thoughts: People with PD are mostly well-educated, professionals, type A, over-achievers, in high stress work, curious, creative, and are outgoing people. People with Parkinson’s are often risk takers and not risk averse. They appear to be determined and are driven to a result. From personal experience, people with Parkinson’s are rich in questions, have an insatiable curiosity, and are quite clever.

What if there is a Parkinson’s profile? What does it mean? Could it help lead us to helping people even before they begin showing symptoms? Parkinson’s disease affects people in so many unique ways that it has been discussed that it could be more than one disease. If PD is more than one disease, it could take several varying solutions to get this illness under control?

The complexity of the human brain and body is unimaginably daunting. It’s inner workings, connectivity with multiple systems, and the diversity of chemical reactions and maintenance is hard to fathom.

In the past thirty years, while I have seen numerous studies, trials, pharmaceuticals, surgeries, procedures, and therapies, however, I have yet to see a targeted individual plan that works for everyone with Parkinson’s. Maybe, if there were an understanding of what our universal link or links to this disease were, we could break it down and eliminate what it is that unites us all, illness-wise.

The brain and all its’ complexities have proven to be a formidable opponent in giving up answers. Parkinson’s disease is a mysterious and complex condition that is going to take multiple approaches to unraveling its’ secrets.

Healing Becomes a Prime Time Show

Healing Becomes a Prime Time Show

The world is shifting faster and even more progressively to complementary medicine, than I would ever have imagined. While late-night television channel surfing, I found a program that appears to be both informative and comforting. This new show is on a channel that I rarely watch. Home to numerous reality and family related dramas, TLC is not a station that usually offers programming that thrills me. I will admit that this show really interests me.

I came across a new show called, The Healer. Let me say that as a Parkinson’s patient and a reiki master, I use the term “healer” very rarely and very carefully. I had to see what TLC was doing with someone who had the ego and gift of restoring one to health. To use the word “healer” takes on a serious responsibility.

Charlie, an Australian entrepreneur, has been using his “gift” for several years and seems to deliver results with varying success. Charlie admits that results may depend upon the malady and the severity of it. I respect that he takes his gift so seriously. He freely admits that some illnesses may not respond well to his energy work, while some may react better. I also like that he shares his gift at no charge.

Doctors on the show are amazed, without explanation, yet appear to be willing to make the mind-shift that energy work may have merit. They are witnesses of the inexplicable. The doctors don’t deny that after Charlie’s treatment, something substantial has just occurred for their patient. Skepticism is understandable from the medical community, but when they see results from complimentary therapies, they should be willing to acknowledge them. One of the biggest dilemmas facing energy workers and the medical community is that if they both worked together, the patient may very well see surprising new results and at minimal cost.

I have seen slightly over one episode so far. I am an energy worker. I find the delving and unveiling of energy work on prime time television as a huge leap in the right direction! Shows like this demystify and shed light on the benefits of touch. This television program helps to show that hands on work has much to offer. In the United States, patients are less likely to pursue energy workers. In my opinion, the reason that many doctor(s) discount or don’t understand the potential benefit of working with energy practitioners is that little to no research has been funded.

Not until seven years into my diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease, at the age of 32 was I introduced to Reiki. From day one, I went from skeptic to believer, immediately. After experiencing what I had so easily discounted, it turned out to be something life-changing. Reiki hasn’t healed me to where I am void of symptoms.  I do know, not scientifically, that Reiki has made my life considerably better, increased my quality of life, and slowed my Parkinson’s progression over these last 20 years!

What does Thanksgiving mean to you?

For me, the holiday resonates with special memories of the whole family watching parades, football, and eating my late mother’s exceptional cooking. Those memories are treasures that line the walls of my Thanksgiving box for the rest of eternity. Those days are long past, but I am still fortunate to make special new memories with dear friends who mean so much to me. Times change, life moves quickly forward, and I am forced to accept change.

I think a keystone of this holiday is about one thing only, gratitude. In the hustle and bustle of shopping, cooking, pre-Christmas preparation, and Black Friday sales, the meaning of Thanksgiving gets blurred.

This year, I have lost more dear friends, neighbors, and close Parkinson’s disease colleagues than I can count on my fingers. Loss of loved ones, both friends and family are so bittersweet as I rejoice in having been part of their lives, yet mourn that those days have ended.

As the year quickly ends, I am ever so grateful for my wife and best friend, Angela, my wacky and hilarious chocolate lab, Lily, my relatives all across the United States, my dear Reiki and Parkinson’s families, and you the reader/subscriber who takes time out of your busy day to read my latest blog post. I am grateful!

Thank You!

Happy Thanksgiving!

Summer Reprise – “Trying to Understand Stress as It Relates to Parkinson’s Disease”

I will be re-releasing this and a few other posts from my archives that I think are worth revisiting:

If you are a frequent reader of this blog or have read my books, you know that I talk a great deal about the impact that I believe stress plays on Parkinson’s disease and the related symptoms of the illness.  Make note, I am neither a doctor nor am I a clinical researcher. I have recently found this fascinating research showing signs of scientific evidence to validate more of what I have experienced and believed to be true – stress may have a significant role in Parkinson’s.

 I have seen benefit and strongly believe that if you are able to lower your stress level, you can improve your symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. There has to be a logical reason why when many of us go on vacation or get deeply involved in a project that engrosses us, we sometimes see improvement in our condition.

How often do you find that when your stress is lower you have unused medication at the end of the day because you found that you didn’t need it?

Does this happen to you when you go away to a place less full of stress, like the beach or the mountains?

If stress does play an important factor in neurological disorders, and it looks very possible, then the science of stress needs deep exploration—quickly.

 I encourage you to read this paper online and judge for yourself. I think that you will find some observations that need further investigation.

To read the paper for yourself, go to http://jnnp.bmj.com/content/85/8/878.long

Parkinson’s Essay Turns 200!

Tomorrow,  James Parkinson‘s essay will be 200 years old. Since his discovery, modern  medicine has made strides with L-Dopa and Carbi-dopa breakthroughs that have become the long-standing gold standard of regimens. Not to diminish the importance of the Levadopa breakthrough, but that was over a half a century ago.
New drugs and procedures are slowly trickling out, but no one drug that I know of has impacted Parkinson’s disease as that of L-Dopa. To this very day,  since my 1991 diagnosis, I have found benefit from this most amazing life-changing drug. I am very lucky to report that my dosage, even after all this time, is a lowly 3 pills (25/100) a day. I aim to keep my pill consumption to the utmost minimum, but only time will tell.

I am hopeful but impatient as I plead with any pharmaceutical company, researcher, doctor, or anyone connected with creating new innovations to the neurological world that a huge need is there, right now, and an escalating problem that will impact so many. I would offer detailed numbers, but at this time, as we have no hard numbers, for lack of a registry devoted to Parkinson’s patients, the numbers just aren’t gathered, yet.

On World Parkinson’s Day (4/11/17), like millions around the world, I will be participating in #UniteForParkinsons. Please join us to spread awareness via social media to the world about Parkinson’s disease.  Visit https://www.worldparkinsonsday.com/#world-parkinsons-day for more information!

Happy Spring!

Sometimes, this is how I feel!

I love Spring, and cannot wait for the weather to retreat! Spring means sun, warmth, and the rebirth of flora and fauna. Greenery galore and the eruption of color come with the season. It means more time outside to explore and take new photographs.

If you are having a less good day, here are a few ways to improve your day:

Aspire

Book, create, initiate, or invite someone or make a plan for something to look forward in the near and distant future. By having something to look forward to (no matter how small), you create a to do item that you can work towards. Maybe you want to see a favorite band in concert or go to your favorite ice cream parlor, you are making plans.

Don’t Hide

Keep social and active! Get out and share information and good times with others!

Get Some Sun-but be cautious

Almost all Parkinson’s disease patients are low in vitamin D. PD patients who take Levadopa may be more be sensitive to sunlight. I see a Dermatologist at least once a year and suggest that you see one at least for a once a year checkup.

Some days are better than others–just remember that tomorrow is another day!

In Reference To My Art (up above)

Allergies, neck pain/headache, morning slowness, sinus congestion, post nasal drip, and cough all may come with the pollen explosion that comes with this time of year. I tend to not drink enough water and keep hydrated. I’m trying to drink more water. Stay hydrated!

Understanding Parkinson’s!

Faces of PD

Parkinson’s Disease (PD) knows no boundaries, when it comes to age.  Young, middle aged, or older, we are all susceptible to the throws of this illness. Parkinson’s is a complex illness that is still not fully understood as to why one person may get the disease but others do not. It may be that PD is actually  more than one disease, under a dome of many.

I don’t know that there is making any sense of this illness. The diversity of symptoms and effective medicines vary so much that it is rare, if ever that two patients share the same symptoms or find the same benefit from a similar regimen.

Unraveling the complexities of this mysterious illness or illnesses continues to be a challenge for medical science. New discoveries may require a new and less conventional methodology for explaining this most elusive and cunning illness.

Respite

RespiteWe all need to pay close attention to our health. It is so easy to be encumbered and engrossed in our work and lose sight of ourselves. We owe it to ourselves, for the preservation of our clarity of thought and refreshing of the body to vacate from the office. Taking time for yourself isn’t a luxury–it’s a necessity! Just taking a few minutes more, every day, can make a difference in your mood, your creativity, and overall well-being.

Photo Creation — Orb 3D

I was experimenting with my phone camera and created this–I hope that you enjoy it! I call it Orb 3D.

If you think it’s cool, please share it. I am trying to keep active and creative and believe it is vital to staying well. Explore your creativity!

Taken by Karl Robb

Taken by Karl Robb

The Eyes Have It–Perspective!

Sky view!Angle, intent, and outlook all sway our perspective. Even when using the best of our senses, there are times when our emotions interfere with our rationale. Keeping a cool head and paying attention to our inner voice might be the extra sense in determining perspective.

This photo over Dallas shows a whole other side of a city that I had never seen before (I was lucky to capture it.). I discovered an amazing and fresh look at a city I thought that I knew well, but now see it clearer and with fresh eyes.

Try, just for today, looking at something that you do or look at everyday, and apply this philosophy. See if you appreciate what you look at, a little more.

You might be pleasantly surprised.

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