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EverydayHealth.com Recognizes ASoftVoice.com Blog as One of the 10 Parkinson’s Disease Blogs to Help You Stay Fit and Positive!

EVERYDAY HEALTH logo www.everydayhealth.comRecently, EverydayHealth.com recognized ASoftVoice.com, as one of the 10 Parkinson’s Disease Blogs to Help You Stay Fit and Positive.

It is such an honor to be included with so many outstanding websites! Many of the chosen blogs on the list are included on our blog resource list. If you know of a blog related to Parkinson’s that we overlooked, please let us know and we will check it out! Thanks to EverydayHealth.com and to you, our readers! Congratulations to the other bloggers on EverydayHealth’s list and to every blog sharing their important story!

Mother’s Day 2018

On this, the 8th Mother’s Day without her, I lit a candle and enjoyed her favorite flower in her memory! She encouraged my blogging, my writing, and ultimately my books! I am so grateful for her support!

Building a Plan for Your Parkinson’s Disease and Your Health

Without some sort of plan or framework, it is very easy to get lost along the way. Whether you have Parkinson’s disease or not, just having goals may not be enough, as unexpected obstacles can arise at the most inconvenient of times. There is so much in our lives that we can’t expect, but must just accept and move on, as best we can.  Our perspective and flexibility can impact how we deal with adversity.

The following few tips are some thoughts and suggestions that you may want to consider. I hope that these tips might trigger some revelations for you.

  1. Consider building a series of plans from your personal medical team, your support network, your health team (trainer, physical therapist, massage therapist, speech pathologist, etc.). Some of these networks may overlap and vary as your providers may change over time.

  2. Keeping current on developments and timely releases about your illness is not only empowering but beneficial to both you and those who you choose to enlighten.

  3. If you have early onset Parkinson’s disease, I strongly suggest for you to consider finding a Neurologist who is a Movement Disorder Specialist, as they have special training dedicated to this illness.

  4. Don’t compare or contrast your Parkinson’s to anyone else’s. We each have our own flavor of Parkinson’s and we each have our own unique journey.

  5. Timing our medications is a crucial component to making the most of our day. Maintaining and strictly adhering to a timely regimen where your medications can work at their best, takes experimentation and some trial and error.

  6. Try not thinking of illness of any kind as a war, a battle, or a win or loss. Consider illness as an obstacle or an obstruction that must be worked around. No one wins a war. War is dark and violent. Maybe, a new perspective towards illness can take some of the anxiety out of it.

  7. Explore the numerous therapies outside of western medicine to see if you can find one that offers benefit or relief. Get good referrals from friends and family.

  8. Keep an open mind to relinquishing some of the responsibility for the good of lowering your stress level and improving your mental health.

  9. Do what you can, while you can! Whether you are healthy or have illness in your life, consider that our control is limited.

  10. While there is definitive change in our lives and the options may vary or seem more limited, we must recognize that we have more strength and control than we realize.

Summer Reprise – “Motivation”

What keeps you motivated?

What gets you out of bed every day?
What makes you happy?
What inspires you?

Every day may be about small victories.

They count.

Be proud of your achievements.

Don’t discount yourself or what you accomplish.

SaveSave

SaveSave

Guest Blogging for PatientsLikeMe #MoreThan Campaign

I am so excited to be part of the @PatientsLikeMe #MoreThan campaign! I recently wrote a blog posting for the PatientsLikeMe blog, which you can read here. I encourage you to tell the world about your #MoreThan story via your social outlets. Sharing your story can help inspire, motivate, and educate. Showing the world that we are #MoreThan our illness is a powerful reminder that those of us dealing with illnesses have families, hopes, dreams, and goals just like everyone without this additional challenge. There is something very powerful about one’s personal story along with a photo. Making your voice heard is crucial for awareness, unity, and community! Thanks to @PatientsLikeMe for this opportunity.

#MoreThan Parkinson's PatientsLikeMe - Karl Robb

#MoreThan Parkinson’s PatientsLikeMe

Health Matters!

It is April and that means it is Parkinson’s Disease Awareness Month!

Everyday ought to be Parkinson’s Awareness Day! For each and everyone of us who lives with this illness, we know that our awareness is real and constant. Now, bring that awareness to those who you encounter or who are less familiar with this illness. Too often, much to my amazement, I meet people completely unaware of what Parkinson’s is and what it can do. We have got to do a better job of telling the world about this illness, and what it is all about.

I refuse to mix politics and ethics. I try to keep my nose out of politics on this site and provide my readers with a perspective that informs and allows you to make your own decision.

I have seen the life-changing impact that Meals On Wheels has made and continues to make on lives. Just the thought of erasing a program as important as  this one, is heartless, cruel, and the sign of a system that is out of touch and totally unfamiliar with real human needs.

To reduce  funding for the FDA and the NIH reduces our hopes for a speedy breakthrough or drug development. Our health matters and many of the best minds in research and future developments come from these organizations.

The elimination of the EPA could cause numerous devastating changes and have even more repercussions on climate change and various environmental factors that impact genetically sensitive people. The future of the animal kingdom on this planet is in even greater jeopardy, than it is right now.

Speak up! Let your voice be heard!

It is so important to share your story and how governmental decisions impact you and those you love.

Photo Creation — Orb 3D

I was experimenting with my phone camera and created this–I hope that you enjoy it! I call it Orb 3D.

If you think it’s cool, please share it. I am trying to keep active and creative and believe it is vital to staying well. Explore your creativity!

Taken by Karl Robb

Taken by Karl Robb

It’s not all in your head–is it?

It might all be connected.In the near 200 years, since the discovery of Parkinson’s Disease (PD), the theories of how, where, when, and why the illness develops varies over time. Science is proving and re-enforcing the belief that everything is connected. When I was officially diagnosed in 1991 with PD, there were only a few doctors who pondered the connection between the gut and the brain. Now, there seems to be a much larger contingent who agree that our gut plays a major factor in our brain function.

The body has a mysterious way of masking itself or maybe it is just due to the complexity of the brain. For several years, my right shoulder rotator cuff hurt and I was unable to find long-lasting relief or an answer to where the pain was coming from. I had seen doctors, taken X-rays, seen massage therapists, and done physical therapy, and all proved to do little, over time. I was sure the pain resided in the shoulder. I was wrong.

I had to go all the way across the United States to find relief. A knowledgeable and very intuitive massage therapist who really paid attention to my arm discovered a very sore spot close to the mid point of my upper arm. Once she released the extreme pain that had been stored in that one spot, the pain in my shoulder dispersed. I would call the results near miraculous. She found the cause of my pain where no one had even thought of looking.

I think that this is sound evidence that there is just so much about the systems of the human body that we just can’t understand, just yet. Over time, new discoveries and breakthroughs may very well reveal astounding relationships between our systems or even unveil how our bodies process certain chemicals and alter our central nervous system. Until the day comes that modern science is capable of unveiling an all encompassing cure, it is our responsibility for exploring our own systemic connections, the roles that stress and anxiety play in our lives, our diets, our sleep patterns, and even how we think, feel, and react.

Our mind, body, and spirit depend upon one another. Maintaining that delicate balance is the key to our health. Finding the missing pieces that might lead us to fulfill the balance may require exploration and investigation outside our comfort zone and even that of our complete understanding. What I thought originated in my shoulder was actually being manipulated by a sore spot in my upper arm, a spot about a half a foot away. Looking closely at ourselves, with a fresh lens can reveal a great deal.

Remembering 2016!

2017! The Parkinson’s Disease (PD) Community lost 2 of its best known iconic figures in 2016. The most recognizable figure on the planet, the boxing legend and humanitarian, Mohamed Ali and Janet Reno, the first  US female Attorney General. Thanks to both of them for their awareness and advocacy in spreading the word on PD and the importance of educating the public, our government, and the medical world. They were very public faces who helped to express the needs of this community.

This year I have been to far too many funerals of dear friends who have succumbed to the symptoms of PD. It is a tragic reality– one, that I dread sharing with you.

It is my hope for 2017, that we see more cooperation from all parties involved in drug manufacturing, drug regulation, and drug research to lead to some understanding of just how our brains work. Someone, somewhere, sometime in the not so distant future is going to recognize a common element or link that may very well break open the mystery of Parkinson’s disease. Until that very special day, when the brain reveals itself, it is our duty to ourselves and our loved ones, to do all that we can for ourselves and our conditions.

I wish all of you, my friends and readers, a very healthy and happy New Year!

Happy Holidaze!

 This time of year it’s hard to be right, some sing carols or Silent Night.

There is but one phrase to cover your back, whether you’re Jewish or Christian, it’ll cover the slack.

Politically safe and correct is this phrase, wishing you well by saying Happy Holidays!

Thanks to all of you for reading my writing. I’d love to hear from you, if you have comments or suggestions for future posts.

Back soon,

                                            Karl

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