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10 Tips for Staying Positive and Proactive

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Watching dogs play in the snow made me laugh!

Here are 10 Tips for Staying Positive and Proactive

  • Take care of yourself. The more you know about Parkinson’s, the better. You play the key role in your own health. Seek out therapies/modalities that work for you. Accepting your illness does not mean giving up.
  • Appreciate the good in every day. Focus on what you can do, not what you can’t do. Savor and appreciate everything.
  • Stay flexible in all ways. A rigid pole often tends to break in the wind. A flexible pole will bend and give in the wind. Being more flexible will add a new dimension to your life.
  • A person with a good attitude is much easier to be around and is good for our well-being.
  • Being positive is a choice! When we label everything “good” or “bad”, we lose sight that we cannot savor one without the other. You cannot have the sweet without the bitter. This is life!
  • Explore the stressors in your daily life. Find an outlet to help you release your stress.
  • Procrastination, denial, fear, and apathy only delay the opportunity to begin our own self care. Don’t hesitate to ask for help when you need it.
  • If you don’t laugh every day, start! Laughter has all kinds of health benefits. Don’t take yourself too seriously. Don’t stop laughing!
  • Plan ahead for what you can and be aware and engaged. Always have a plan B, C, or more.
  • The best exercise or activity is the one that you like and you are willing to do. If Parkinson’s prohibits us from doing something we love, then we must find a replacement for that activity.

Click this link for the 10 Tips PDF to share.

10 Tips for Staying Positive and Proactive

I recently developed this list for the Parkinson’s Wellness Chapter in Cincinnati (http://www.parkinsonswellness.org/) OH.   I thought I should make it available to all of you, so here’s the list:

10 Tips for Staying Positive and Proactive

  • Take care of yourself. The more you know about Parkinson’s, the better. You play the key role in your own health. Seek out therapies/modalities that work for you. Accepting your illness does not mean giving up.
  • Appreciate the good in every day. Focus on what you can do, not what you can’t do. Savor and appreciate everything.
  • Stay flexible in all ways. A rigid pole often tends to break in the wind. A flexible  pole will bend and give in the wind. Being more flexible will add a new dimension to your life.
  • A person with a good attitude is much easier to be around and is good for our well-being.
  • Being positive is a choice! When we label everything “good” or “bad”, we lose sight that we cannot savor one without the other. You cannot have the sweet without the bitter. This is life!
  • Explore the stressors in your daily life. Find an outlet to help you release your stress.
  • Procrastination, denial, fear, and apathy only delay the opportunity to begin our own self care. Don’t hesitate to ask for help when you need it.
  • If you don’t laugh every day, start! Laughter has all kinds of health benefits. Don’t take yourself too seriously. Don’t stop laughing!
  • Plan ahead for what you can and be aware and engaged. Always have a plan B, C, or more.
  • The best exercise or activity is the one that you like and you are willing to do. If Parkinson’s prohibits us from doing something we love, then we must find a replacement for that activity.

I hope these are helpful to you.

Karl

Getting Better

After my long history with Parkinson’s disease, I am amazed and overjoyed that I have had the ability to consistently improve and show signs of getting better.  I won’t tell you that there weren’t dips in the road as some of life’s roadblocks hit me and my progress deviated briefly, but part of staying focused on one’s own healing is to stay open and flexible in mind and body. 

I’ve had this illness at least 25 years of my 45 total years, so I don’t expect to get well overnight. My expectations are realistic. My body can only heal so fast. It took me awhile to get sick and it’ll take some time to get well.

Recently, a major network, I won’t say which, it begins with a “C” and ends in an “S”, did a story that I found incomplete, poorly researched, and all-in-all, just plain wrong. The story was that a positive attitude did not make a difference when dealing with major illness. Their argument was that modern science has proven that there is no basis for positive thinking to be either a deterrent nor a cure for sickness. I say it is rubbish. I know people who are better off and showing improvement  because they maintain a positive attitude. I am living proof . I think the producers failed to thoroughly research this issue as fully as they should have.

Even if science has shown that a positive attitude isn’t beneficial in fighting illness, which I know is false, who are they to try and dash the hopes of millions of people clinging to the hope of improving their condition? Maybe, just maybe, some reports and supposed news ought best be kept quiet.  On top of all the negative reporting that the news brings us, who in knowing this report does it really help? I, for one, am staying positive, because it works.

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