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Understanding Parkinson’s!

Faces of PD

Parkinson’s Disease (PD) knows no boundaries, when it comes to age.  Young, middle aged, or older, we are all susceptible to the throws of this illness. Parkinson’s is a complex illness that is still not fully understood as to why one person may get the disease but others do not. It may be that PD is actually  more than one disease, under a dome of many.

I don’t know that there is making any sense of this illness. The diversity of symptoms and effective medicines vary so much that it is rare, if ever that two patients share the same symptoms or find the same benefit from a similar regimen.

Unraveling the complexities of this mysterious illness or illnesses continues to be a challenge for medical science. New discoveries may require a new and less conventional methodology for explaining this most elusive and cunning illness.

Friday nature photo!

Awareness.

Awareness.

The 2016 WPC’s New “Book Nook” Will Bring Readers And Authors Together!

Check out WPC's Book Nook

Check out WPC’s Book Nook

I have been fortunate to have attended 2 World Parkinson Congresses, Washington and Montreal. Both events were outstanding in information and learning about what is new in the world of Parkinson’s disease.

Join us at the 4th World Parkinson’s Congress in Portland, Oregon this September 20-23, 2016 —Register Now!

If you didn’t already know, registration for the World Parkinson Congress (WPC) is NOW Open! This September an international contingent of scientists, activists, experts, vendors, writers, researchers, medical experts, body workers, and so many others who focus on Parkinson’s disease will convene in Portland, Oregon for this huge event. For my fellow Americans, I encourage you to take advantage of the fact that the #WPC2016 is in the US, once again and in the great city of Portland. The WPC only happens every 3 years! This is a wonderful opportunity to learn what is happening around the globe and meet many of the world’s leaders in their field. Click here to learn more or to register today!

WPC Book Nook
2016’s WPC will be providing something new this year with their Book Nook! Meet some of the authors behind many of the Parkinson’s books that you have read or plan to read. Some authors may do a reading as well. If you are an author writing about Parkinson’s disease read about the requirements for submitting your application for approval. This is a great opportunity to bring authors and readers together! For more information, click here.

Bond Is Back and Parkinson’s Is Still Here

Held in Bondage

Held in Bondage

Today, the newest James Bond blockbuster, SPECTRE, is released in the United States! The Bond films are now over 50 years old, just like the gold standard Parkinson’s drug, L-Dopa. The movie cost over $300 million and made $80 million in a record breaking weekend in the United Kingdom.

I am and have always been a huge Bond fan so don’t get me wrong. I am wondering why and how we can devote so much capital, time, and labor into the entertainment and sports industries and see so much innovation within those industries but see such little innovation within medical breakthroughs?

A Look At Young Onset Parkinson’s Disease

If your first experience with Parkinson’s disease (PD) was anything like mine, I went into a state of shock, disbelief, and a spiral of “what do I do now” syndrome. That was a long, long time ago, here in this galaxy, not so far away.

Since then, I have had almost 28 years to digest and understand (or at least try to) what it means to face the diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease. While in my very first neurological waiting room I found myself, a 23 year old, surrounded by much older patients in wheelchairs with various conditions. At the time, I, like most of the public was positive from all that I knew that only the elderly get Parkinson’s disease. A few years after my diagnosis, it was bittersweet reinforcement from Michael J. Fox’s release of diagnosis that Parkinson’s was not exclusive to those over the age of 60. I would like to think the world outside of the Parkinson’s community has a grasp on the nuances of our Illness, but I think I would be wrong.

Many are surprised that I was diagnosed so young despite that the face of Fox has largely become synonymous with this Illness. Both,

Fighting for right(and candy) at a young age!

Fighting for right(and candy) at a young age!

he and I and many others that I know are not anomalies. We are young and we are a growing segment of the population with Young Onset Parkinson’s disease.

At the time of my diagnosis, I was said to be in the rare two percentile of patients. Now, according to the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation (PDF) it is estimated four percent of people with PD are diagnosed before the age of 50. It is estimated that 60,000 new cases are diagnosed a year and somewhere between 1 million to 1.5 million people in the United States are living with it. The truth is, until data collection is put in place, all these numbers are sheer speculation. To learn more about data collection for Parkinson’s disease and what you can do go to http://parkinsonsaction.org/our-work/data-collection/.

Neurological disorders largely remain a mystery mainly due to the sheer complexities of the human brain. Better government funding, a drive for expediency, better institutional sharing and cooperation about data, and a public outcry that urgency is required right now must be reiterated over and over.

Parkinson’s in color!

Parkinson's word art!

Parkinson’s word art!

A Twenty Year Old Speech Rings True

I was going through my files of paperwork and came across years of documents that I considered to be motivational, inspirational, and truly worth being read and reread. You might even remember it.

Although this following post is not specifically Parkinson’s disease related, I find it to be sound and practical advice for everyone. I hope that you enjoy it, find at least 1 of the 10 pieces of advice to be a morsel to take away, and may even share once again with others:

Palo Alto High School Speech by Guy Kawasaki 6/11/95

10. Live off of your parents as long as possible.
9. Pursue joy—not happiness.
8. Challenge the known and embrace the unknown.
7. Learn to speak a foreign language, play a musical instrument, and play no contact sports.
6. Continue to learn.
5. Learn to like yourself or change yourself until you can like yourself.
4. Don’t get married too young.
3. Play to win and win to play.
2. Obey the absolutes.
1. Enjoy your family and friends before they are gone.

If I were to add to this thoughtful list, I might add – Tell the people in your life and those you care about, just how much they mean to you, while you still can!

 

advice worth consideration

Advice worth consideration

FDA Reaches Out To Learn More On Those With Parkinson’s Disease

Yesterday, I had the honor and privilege of testifying in front of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA), about symptoms of Parkinson’s and how they impact daily living. The event brought out at least 20 or more of the FDA’s neurological specialists and decision makers. I watched as they listened to my fellow panelists testify about their struggles with Parkinson’s disease and many took copious notes about what was said.

A good day at the FDA!

A good day at the FDA!

I am confident that they were listening to the plights of those of us facing a variety of issues related to our illness. It is my sincere hope and plea that something positive, like an ongoing dialogue between FDA and patient, or even a rapid push for speedier development of therapies is implemented. It is encouraging and wonderful to see interest from the FDA and the Parkinson’s community. This can be nothing but positive and hopeful!

A Gentle Reminder

This is a gentle reminder to all the selfless caregivers, care-partners, doctors, nurses, orderlies, therapists, speech pathologists, social workers, and anyone who comes in contact with people touched by a neurological illness. Remember these 5 important points before you react, speak, take offense, lose your temper, or give up:

  1. Everyone has a history and a story. The person who you are dealing with now has had and may still have a very full life that you only see a portion. Give them the credit and respect that they are due.
  2. The current state of the patient that you are seeing doesn’t need more stress, tension or conflict in their lives, working together you both can make life better for the patient and not worse.
  3. Give your loved one or patient flexibility and deal with them creatively and an open mind. If they aren’t responding to medications offer music therapy, touch, or seek a personal solution which motivates the patient. There is a need for gentleness and understanding.
  4. The person with whom you are interacting may have done some important things in their life, raised a family, changed many lives, and been far more active than they are now. Their current condition is not by choice. Show compassion, patience, caring, and generosity.
  5. Someday, in the not so distant future, you or someone who you care deeply for could be facing these very same challenges.

Dogs Give Us So Much!

Pure Sweetness!

Pure Sweetness!

 

Animals have healing properties all of their own. Look deep into these amazing and loving eyes and you can sense the intense power. She makes me laugh and smile and can frustrate me to no end. That’s my dog!

 

 

 

 

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