Blog Archives

Dyskinesia Isn’t A Dance and It Really Isn’t Funny!

Dyskinesia is the uncontrollable jerky movement of hands, feet, or head. Often misunderstood, dyskinesia is a side effect of the Parkinson’s disease medication. Sometimes, this side effect is embarrassing, annoying, and at times even dangerous. Besides drawing attention to you from complete body writhing, dyskinesia can be exhausting. When I experienced 1 to 2 hour episodes of dyskinesia, I would feel like I ran a marathon without ever leaving home. Small spaces, sharp edges, and anything glass or breakable was a potential hazard. Trying to hold a drink with dyskinesia is a struggle, as your hand wants to splatter everything in sight but your mind screams, “Don’t do it!”

Tremor and dyskinesia are different. Unlike tremor, dyskinesia is bigger than a rapid twitch or tremble. At times, my entire body wiggled and flailed. It still happens, but only on an infrequent basis. Dyskinesia interferes with delicate and precise movements as well as simple everyday tasks, like making a sandwich, pouring a drink, or slicing bread. Someone with dyskinesia may struggle to brush their teeth, comb their hair, or just perform normal acts of daily living. Constant care and awareness is heightened to avoid food from flying everywhere.

BellPeople who don’t know me that well, who may see a brief shake, may laughingly call it a “dance”. Calling dyskinesia a dance may be meant to lighten the severity and discomfort of the event for all involved. Dancing is by choice—dyskinesia is not. I tolerate this comment but admittedly wish that those calling dyskinesia a dance could refrain from reducing a drug interaction that affects so many, to a recreational act. Dyskinesia in public is a teachable moment! Explaining to the uninitiated that this isn’t part of the illness of Parkinson’s has been a constant challenge.

Understanding dyskinesia from the non-scientific perspective isn’t that complicated, but trying to negotiate it, reduce it, and calm it, is the hard part. Never knowing when or where it might crop up can keep you on edge. It adds more stress—not what you need! Over time, I have gotten better about finding some control with the help of meditation, yoga, breathing, and reiki.

I realize that the distinction between tremor and dyskinesia probably in the scheme of things isn’t all that crucial, but what is important is the way either symptom is accepted by the public. Educating the public and demystifying the nuances of Parkinson’s can bridge the gap and clarify just what the public should understand about symptoms and side effects related to Parkinson’s disease.

Being Mindful plus Adding Knowledge (a partial reprise with new information)

 

Keeping focus and staying mindful is a daily challenge for most of us but add chronic illness to the equation and the challenge gets that much harder. With all the emails, voicemails and other electronic messages, signs, advertisements, phone calls, and various shout outs from the world, distraction of thought is so easy.

Finding a peace within ourselves comes much easier when we are able to separate ourselves from the frenzy and din of modern technology.  Taking a few moments a day of quiet time for yourself can ease tension, quiet the mind, and clear your thoughts.  A few minutes of peace is like a reboot for the brain.

We must never let ourselves stop learning and adding new abilities. The overwhelming multitude of information from how to juggle, how to whistle, how to tie a bow tie, how to draw, to almost any talent that you desire can be found on youtube.com. If you want to learn a language, take a course, or just find a video to make you smile or laugh out loud, there is a good chance that you’ll find it.

If you want to learn math, business, science, and a wide range of classes that you either missed the first go around or want to try again, checkout khanacademy.com.

I have discovered that the tactile feel of a pen on paper and on a tablet has led to improving my ability to write and draw. What once was illegible is now discernable, and I think I owe it to being mindful and focused while in the moment. I have found that by trying to teach myself to draw that I have better control of the pen or pencil.

Make a list of 5 to 10 goals that you might want to complete like: 1) Learn a really good card trick, learn the secret to telling a joke, learn how to make a better cookie, tie a bow tie, how to juggle, learn to meditate, or sharpen a knife. These are just a few of the opportunities to take advantage of on the web. You will be surprised by the diversity and quality of the material that is available at no cost.

Just learning one new talent or honing an old talent is a good way to keep the mind and body active and connected. Stay open-minded and flexible! Try your best and stay focused on the task at hand.

There is still a great deal that you can do and enjoy. Try something new today.

%d bloggers like this: