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You’ve Got To Be A Kid, Sometimes! Let’s Go To the Movies!

It isn’t often that I write a movie review.

Okay! In fact, I NEVER write movie reviews. I’m feeling nostalgic and re-connected with the past from a long-awaited 14 years. After 14 years, the sequel to The Incredibles is here! I saw it on Thursday, and it did not disappoint! I wish it hadn’t been over a decade and a half, but it was a blast!

If you loved the original, The Incredibles2 picks up right where the first left us—and that’s all you need to know about the sequel. Just know that the movie is full of action and humor. Enough said!

The geniuses at Pixar did not skimp on detail, sound, or music. This sequel is a fun house, chock full of gems including mid-century motifs of Knoll, Noguchi, Saarinen, Herman Miller furniture, clothing, cars, and architecture.

We had played hooky to go make time to see this movie, something we don’t do very often. The message here, as hidden as it may seem, you might want to:

1. Plan future events to look forward to
2. Treat yourself
3. Savor the little things
4. Avoid always being so serious
5. Laugh as much as you can
6. Work hard and play hard
7. Remember, it’s fun to act like a kid—when the time is right

Let your inner kid out, every so often and take it all in!

EverydayHealth.com Recognizes ASoftVoice.com Blog as One of the 10 Parkinson’s Disease Blogs to Help You Stay Fit and Positive!

EVERYDAY HEALTH logo www.everydayhealth.comRecently, EverydayHealth.com recognized ASoftVoice.com, as one of the 10 Parkinson’s Disease Blogs to Help You Stay Fit and Positive.

It is such an honor to be included with so many outstanding websites! Many of the chosen blogs on the list are included on our blog resource list. If you know of a blog related to Parkinson’s that we overlooked, please let us know and we will check it out! Thanks to EverydayHealth.com and to you, our readers! Congratulations to the other bloggers on EverydayHealth’s list and to every blog sharing their important story!

Accept Your Mission! It’s Not Impossible! Focus Your Energy, Wisely!

If you are embarrassed, sad, shamed, or lack self confidence about having Parkinson’s, I am here to tell you that you don’t have the energy or time to devote to such unproductive emotions. Stay strong! You have joined a community of amazing, caring, helpful people who are there to support you and encourage you. Spending time on activities that take you away from being your best will only deplete you more. Choosing to be positive and to be your very best can be a reality and not a mushy platitude!

It is up to you to make the first move. Admitting and succumbing to the realization that you need help is not weakness but new found strength. Helping oneself to learn about how others are surviving and thriving benefits all involved. This generous group of people with Parkinson’s and care partners are ready and willing to share their experiences of what has worked and what needs improving. There are tomes of great advice, educational videos, supportive medical experts, and organizations with helpful support groups and exercise programs! Be aware that your improvement and care all begins with your passion, diligence, and commitment to getting better.

I won’t say that being thrust into the world of Parkinson’s is easy and nor is it your first thought to just accept it and move forward. I had some dark days until I realized that my body, mind, and spirit were in jeopardy. My being is my responsibility. There is plenty of help out there, but you are your greatest resource. Now, build your team!

Parkinson’s is an illness that you do not fight, but work with, work around, and find solutions that work for you. In other words, Parkinson’s takes work! I, like you, am on a constant and continuous hunt for wellness or at the very least, some therapy, drug, exercise, or device to improve my condition. I wish you well!

Mother’s Day 2018

On this, the 8th Mother’s Day without her, I lit a candle and enjoyed her favorite flower in her memory! She encouraged my blogging, my writing, and ultimately my books! I am so grateful for her support!

Words Matter In Medicine–Compassion and Kindness Are 2 To Focus On!

When I was first diagnosed, the neurologist in 1991, coldly and in a matter of fact tone informed me that I had “a reptilian stare”! I don’t know if this is an official piece of medical terminology or the vernacular, but I most assuredly must express my thoughts of using such a crude comparison.

Doctors can be outstanding resources for data gathering and possible new treatments, but often fizzle when it comes to bedside manner, hand-holding, support, thinking outside the box, or just sharing compassion. I know that there are some of them out there and I hope that your doctor or doctors are of the compassionate qualification—but if he or she is not, what do you do?

Here lies the $64,000 question (old reference-sorry), of asking what it is that you expect to receive from your physician and how it is delivered?

Is it so difficult to reach your doctor that you can’t get a 24-hour response? Any response?

Navigating the labyrinth-like phone system of most medical providers is a test of resilience and sheer willpower. I think that it might just be an exercise to see just how committed their patients are to the practice. I would compare calling doctors’ offices a close comparison to my childhood game playing of that ever so frustrating, never-ending game of Chutes and Ladders—almost as annoying as pick up sticks. Ahhhhhhhhh, the good old days.

Some doctors’ offices think that they have joined the 21st century by installing these “portals” that are misnamed, closer to a black hole, are often unread on a timely basis, and overly buggy or confusing to maneuver around—other than my issues, they are great!

I don’t have any insight into defying the complexities of the phone systems or portal projections, but you might express your frustrations to your doctor and any staff who will listen. Be sure and share the good stuff with your doctor’s office as well, when this might happen.

A Video To Inspire!

This is my first real attempt at an inspirational film. I hope you enjoy it and share it.

My First Inspirational Video!

I hope that you find this thought-provoking and calming! These are some of my many original photos mixed in with some thoughts. You may have to watch more than once to read everything. Thanks!

April Is Parkinson’s Disease Awareness Month!

Stephen Hawking Went Far and Beyond Thus Excelling Limits, Barriers, and Boundaries!

In the past week, I mentioned the loss of Toys R US, which is a sad memory for all of us who loved our toy stores. The toy store, while an important piece of our past, isn’t nearly as crucial as the loss of Theoretical Physicist, Stephen Hawking.

Stephen Hawking besides being an amazing scientist and one of the greatest visionaries of our time, was a handicapped man who far exceeded his outwardly apparent limitations. Through Hawking’s work in space and time, he gained respect and accolades for his contribution to science, the world, but especially to those of us living with neurological challenges.

Hawking was known for his brilliance but also for his wit and incredible sense of humor. When you looked at Professor Stephen Hawking, his wheelchair and voice communicator became a part of his being. What Hawking wrote and thought has left an impact far louder and more important than his ALS. We looked beyond what most would label as a disability. Hawking lived far longer than ever expected, made a huge contribution to science, and proved that one can truly overcome the adversity of illness.

As a writer, inventor, author, and someone with Parkinson’s disease for over 30 years, I always admired Stephen Hawking. Not until his passing, did I really understand the dignity and awareness that he projected for all of us dealing with chronic health conditions. He showed a strength and tenacity that is an inspiration that I will never forget.

Don’t Expect Everyone To Understand Parkinson’s-2018!

This was my first blog post 10 years ago–slightly updated!

When I was first diagnosed at the age of 23, I have to admit, the diagnosis of Parkinson’s Disease (PD )came as a relief. What I had convinced myself was a terminally malignant brain tumor was a chronic neurological deficiency of the neurotransmitter, Dopamine–that didn’t sound as bad. Sure, PD can be degenerative and rarely do people with PD get better, over time–but I will say I haven’t changed my medication for several years.  I am lucky and fortunate that my symptoms show a slow progression.

We expect our loved ones, friends, associates, and colleagues to understand our struggle with this difficult ailment. Parkinson’s challenges us all in different ways. Rarely, if ever, do two PD patients share the exact same symptoms. Those who are healthy and untouched by PD are incapable of understanding what it is that we endure with this mysterious and troubling disease. As much as we would like for those who are close to us to understand what it is that we are going through, it just isn’t possible.

Even if we live or work with someone on a daily basis, there is only so much that we are capable of understanding about what it is that they are going through. The best that we can do for any one is to be present, understanding, compassionate, and supportive. Supportive doesn’t mean that you can’t encourage better living and reminding those who you care about to exercise, eat healthier, and to get proper rest.

I’d like to know about your experience with PD. I plan to address issues facing PD patients like doctors, resources, medicines, cooperative medicine, health ideas, what works and doesn’t , Support Groups, PD Conferences, etc.

I hope you find this interesting and helpful.

Thank You!

Karl

AsoftVoice.com celebrates a decade of blogging on Parkinson’s disease!

It is official—this blog, www.Asoftvoice.com, is 10 years old!

With over 300 archived posts pertaining to Parkinson’s disease and living well, it has been a labor of love! Here is to the next 10 years and with luck, a continuation. I hope to hear from more of you, so that I might address topics of interest.

I am happy to report that I don’t have a problem with procrastination—in fact, I’m good at it! Call it a talent, call it a mastery, and to think that I have no training! I am a Master Procrastinator! I admit it—I procrastinate more these days, to stay creative and fluid. I like to work odd hours, sometimes. I write when inspiration calls. So, here are some thoughts to share with you that I hope you can use:

  1. Parkinson’s disease is a strange and quirky illness with a host of awkward and annoying symptoms. I don’t make light of the seriousness of this illness, but if you keep too rigid, you will surely snap. As hard as it may be, hold on to smiling and laughing–as best as you can– it is so important to monitor and maintain a sense of humor. Humor and a positive attitude can go a long way, with any illness! Laughter really is a great medicine!

  2. Parkinson’s disease is a wonderful excuse to break convention— you may find that you enjoy living outside the regular everyday box. It may take time. I’ve had over 30 years to adjust, so forgive me if I make it sound easy. Living with Parkinson’s is anything, but easy.

  3. The fact is that structuring your day and schedule to accommodate your on-times as well as your off-times can make your days far less stress-filled and less dramatic.

  4. The label of Parkinson’s disease covers a broad range of symptoms, some apparent and some unseen by public eyes. No two of us is exactly alike and therefore, our symptoms, medications, progression, and helpful therapies may differ.

  5. If Parkinson’s teaches us anything, it is to slow down the rapid pace of life, look around and enjoy it, to eat slower and savor what we are eating. Parkinson’s is an unusual teacher that forces us to slow down whether we choose to or not. See this new pace as an opportunity.

I don’t know what the next 10 years will bring, but I plan to continue to share and expand my voice through this site, maybe a 3rd or 4th book, and maybe a few surprises (good ones) along the way. I hope that you’ll join me for the ride!

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